A Brief Overview of Toxins That Are Known to Cause Autoimmunity

DISCLAIMER: CONSULT WITH A DOCTOR BEFORE DECIDING ON A TREATMENT PLAN FOR ANY DISEASE OR INJURY.

In May of 1981 in Spain, a new syndrome suddenly developed that was caused by the distribution of industrial rapeseed oil that had been refined to remove aniline denaturants. Itinerant salesmen had been selling unlabeled 5 liter bottles of this “refined oil” and ultimately, 20,000 people were affected by what later became known as Toxic Oil Syndrome. About 1,200 people died from exposure to this rapeseed oil which contained only traces of toxic fatty acid anilides and related compounds. Scientists are still not entirely sure what the contaminant was that actually caused Toxic Oil Syndrome and investigation into this health problem continues.

 

Though Toxic Oil Syndrome was eventually identified as a type of poisoning, patients’ symptoms resembled autoimmune disease. Indeed, scientists have noted that those who were exposed to the toxic rapeseed oil often went on to be diagnosed with diseases like scleroderma, eosinophilic fasciitis, and eosinophilic perimyositis, as well as other similar diseases.

 

The Toxic Oil Syndrome fiasco in Spain highlights the fact that toxins that cause autoimmune disease symptoms are not always easy to identify or isolate. Medications that cause autoimmune disease, for example, may contain unlisted ingredients or “excipients” that cause autoimmunity in patients even if the medicinal agent itself is not at fault. And often medicinal agents are at fault. A number of drugs and drug classes like Proton Pump Inhibitors that are prescribed for minor health problems like heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) are famous for causing autoimmune disease symptoms.  It can take some intense detective work to actually locate the offending agents that cause autoimmune disease symptoms and often, there is no funding for this kind of detective work. Indeed, there may even be a great deal of funding by big organization being invested into preventing the detective work from happening. So patients can’t always rely on scientific data to prove that their symptoms are being caused by toxins and not by an innate autoimmune response.

 

The Barefoot Healer’s Guide to Autoimmune Disease, Volume 1 – BUY HERE!

Autoimmune Disease, Toxins, and Detoxification

Autoimmune disease sufferers must use their intuition regarding toxins, exposure to drugs, or environmental poisons to decide what action to take to cure autoimmune disease. In the early 1900s, prior to the creation of the American Medical Association and Big Pharma, autoimmunity was viewed as an impossible phenomena. Today, there’s a huge body of scientific literature that still points to the idea that autoimmunity is not a real thing, but rather a relatively new label for toxic buildup in the body and/or pathogenic colonization of the body. For this reason, we usually encourage clients to combine a protocol of detoxification with a protocol of tried-and-true autoimmune disease cures that restore immune system function and organ health while killing pathogens, even those that are living in remote areas of the body.

 

There’s a relationship between pathogenic colonization of the bone marrow, liver, brain, or lymphatic system and toxic overload that begs the question of whether autoimmune disease is real or rather just a manifestation of physiological toxicity followed by pathogenic colonization of weakened tissues in the body. Antibiotics provide the easiest, most obvious connection between toxic load and pathogenic colonization in that antibiotics are often toxic to the body and many of them, including penicillins have been proven as drugs that cause autoimmune disease. Antibiotics may kill pathogens living in the colon or in the lungs, but often, they’re metabolized and broken down in the liver which means that the liver cannot itself be treated using antibiotics that a doctor would prescribe. So these antibiotics that are toxic may be causing autoimmune disease symptoms by increasing the liver’s toxic load or they may be causing autoimmune disease symptoms by driving pathogens into hiding inside the liver or other organ systems in the body. In either case, these drugs, which are widely prescribed, are common offenders that can trigger autoimmune disease years after they’re initially prescribed.

 

In other words, autoimmune disease may very well be a product of the conventional medical system. It may be something that Big Pharma has manufactured rather than a natural phenomena that Big Pharma can treat. 

 

But that being said, there are environmental toxins like mycotoxins and mold that can cause general inflammation in the body that resemble autoimmune disease symptoms. And Big Ag and Big Food contribute plenty to the problem of autoimmune disease through the widespread application of organophosphate insecticides or bromide-containing insecticides. Cosmetics and personal care products are another big source of autoimmune disease-causing substances like formaldehyde. While a strong exposure to something like bromide or organophosphates from crop sprays nearby might trigger an autoimmune response, cosmetics products or fluoride in the water supply or toothpaste may be the straw that breaks the camel’s back, so to speak, in terms of pushing a given patient over the threshold to where symptoms can’t be ignored anymore. An antibiotic medication administered during childhood might leave a reservoir of pathogens living quietly in the liver that aren’t activated to produce autoimmune disease symptoms until many years later when a patient undergoes a stressful event along with exposure to formaldehyde following, say, home renovations or some other event that seems harmless, if not positive in terms of health. The specific triggers that cause any given autoimmune disease are likely to be different in every patient and finding those triggers to eliminate them can take months, if not years of sustained effort. Nonetheless, it’s likely that most patients can experience total recovery if they dedicate themselves to overcoming these diseases. The healthcare culture and conventional medicine as a whole currently cultivates autoimmune disease symptoms as well as beliefs, so those who wish to overcome autoimmunity have to realize that they’re forging the way along a path that is not very well trod. Healing takes effort and learning and a willingness to go against prevailing views of autoimmune disease. 

 

Patients who seek out a vaccine in an effort to preserve human health later discover that the vaccine has seemingly destroyed their health. Vaccines are related to the topic of heavy metal exposure as well as to the topic of exposure to formaldehyde and other chemicals that cause autoimmune disease. But vaccines have been a mainstay in healthcare for many years and the general public has been taught to believe in vaccines with a sort of religious fervor that requires some sort of personal experience as a way to overcome it. Nonetheless, the evidence is stacking up against vaccines in a general way and many people who were once pro-vaxxers have become anti-vaxxers as a result of their personal experiences with the COVID vaccine. Autoimmune disease symptoms that have been caused by the COVID vaccine have brought to light the fact that vaccines may, in fact, be causing more health issues than they’re solving. 

 

For many readers, finding a cause for their autoimmune disease symptoms is the first step toward finding a cure, but it is possible to find a cure for an autoimmune disease without ever fully understanding the root cause of the disease. For most autoimmune disease sufferers, healing from the disease takes place in small steps over the course of a year or longer and usually, it involves a combination of detoxification strategies, diet changes and lifestyle changes, along with specific treatments that may seem completely unfamiliar and strange compared to the treatment usually rendered by doctors and pharmacists. But toxins and toxic overload is one of the leading causes of autoimmune disease and something that is readily recognized in most scientific articles on the topic of autoimmunity. That being the case, it would make sense for all autoimmune disease patients to begin their healing journey with a general system of detoxification, broad spectrum treatment to kill pathogens, and nutrient supplements to rebuild tissues that have been weakened by chronic infection and toxic overload .

 

Download the book Root Cause to learn more about how to protect the body from organophosphates and bromide-containing insecticides.

 

Poisons That Cause Autoimmune Disease: What Happens When Toxins Build Up in Your Body

In the scientific literature, autoimmune diseases are heavily correlated with two things: 

 

  1. The presence of pathogens living in remote areas of the body like the bone marrow, the liver or gallbladder, the lymphatic system, or the brain and
  2. The presence of toxins that may directly cause autoimmune disease symptoms or that may lower the body’s resistance to pathogenic colonization. 

 

When we began doing research into the topic of autoimmune disease cures, we found that time and again, scientists were citing correlations between infection and autoimmune disease or correlations between autoimmune disease and toxin exposure. In the initial phases of discovery, Lydian and I decided to take a detour in our research to learn more about organophosphates and autoimmune disease along with bromide-containing insecticide exposure and autoimmunity. The research into organophosphate exposure and autoimmune disease, cancer, and other serious health problems was so compelling that we wrote the book Root Cause before continuing on with this current book. Anyone who’s interested in using detoxification to cure autoimmune disease can download Root Cause here to better understand the connection between environmental toxins and autoimmune disease.

Pesticides

The topic of environmental toxins and autoimmune disease is scary for a lot of people because commercial insecticide applications seem like a problem that can’t be solved or avoided. In some cases, this might be true, but our view is that the body is incredibly resilient and human beings are designed to adapt to changing conditions which includes pesticide exposure. Autoimmune disease sufferers who believe their disease may be caused by lawn pesticides, nearby crop spraying, or pesticide exposure that occurs through their work may need to consider changing locations temporarily to detoxify the body and restore health, but for individuals who don’t have the financial ability to move away from environmental toxins, there are two nutrients that we’ll discuss below that can specifically protect the body from bio-accumulation of some of the most widely used insecticide chemicals that wreak havoc on human health: organophosphates and bromide.

 

Organophosphates and Autoimmune Diseases

I’ve read that in a number of communities, residents have protested the use of organophosphate insecticides in favor of using bromide-containing insecticides thinking that bromide is less toxic than organophosphate. Unfortunately, however, these two environmental toxins cause health damage through similar pathways in the body by inhibiting the absorption of two of the most important nutrients that maintain human health: iodine and vitamin K2 (which is also known as menaquinone-7 or MK-7). 

 

Though the word “organophosphate” doesn’t, at first glance, seem to pertain in any way to calcium absorption or utilization in the body, these insecticides have a profound impact on calcium, bone health, and nervous system health. Calcium is one of those minerals that is best obtained from food sources rather than from supplements because it’s easy to take in too much calcium and suffer negative health effects as a result. On the other hand, calcium is nearly ubiquitous in the foods that we eat. Nonetheless though, Big Pharma has worked hard to push the idea that patients need more calcium which leads to health issues like atherosclerosis (calcification of the arteries), heart disease, poor bone health, and other serious problems. Indeed, vitamin D is promoted as a cure-all by the pharmaceutical industry even though this nutrient shouldn’t even be classified as a vitamin because the human body produces it naturally when the skin is exposed to sunlight (as long as the person is not wearing sunscreen or a lot of heavy clothing). Vitamin D supplementation enhances calcium absorption in the body to our detriment particularly when we are deficient in vitamin K2, a fact that is practically unknown in mainstream culture.

 

When I hear the word “organophosphate”, I immediately think of vitamin K2, a nutrient that is practically unknown in the modern world in part because of its ability to treat and cure bone cancers and blood cancers like leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Vitamin K2 is a nutrient that shuttles calcium where it needs to go in the body, namely into the bone tissues to ensure that bone marrow is healthy and blood tissues are also healthy. But vitamin K2 also ensures that calcium levels in the blood don’t get too high. If calcium lingers in the blood supply (due to a lack of vitamin K2), iodine can’t be absorbed properly which means that the thyroid gland won’t function properly and the entire endocrine system will be dysregulated as a result. This thyroid dysregulation is an underlying problem that causes many autoimmune disease symptoms. Often, Lugol’s iodine and vitamin K2 supplementation solves the problem.

 

In high doses, organophosphate pesticides function as nerve gasses because of their effect on calcium in the body (calcium plays a major role in nerve transmission), but in lower doses, when organophosphates are administered chronically over time (like where your neighbor applies regular doses of organophosphate pesticides to their lawn each week), organophosphates wreak havoc on human health by bioaccumulating in bone tissues. Indeed, organophosphates build up in bone tissues reliably such that Big Pharma decided to repurpose them as drugs called “bisphosphonates” for the treatment of osteoporosis (a low bone density disease). When organophosphates build up in bone tissues, they cause the bone tissues to look stronger and more dense on x-ray though patients who take bisphosphonates are actually more likely to experience a certain types of bone fracture (which essentially means that their bones look stronger on x-ray but they are actually weaker as a result of taking bisphosphonate drugs). In other words, bisphosphonates hurt bone tissues and bone marrow tissue and loved ones of patients who take these drugs have anecdotally noted a connection between taking bisphosphonates and the subsequent development of dementia, a nervous system disorder that develops as a result of the patient’s chronic exposure to organophosphates that impact calcium levels in the body. Iin many cases, patients who take vitamin K2 / menaquinone-7 and who stop taking vitamin D3, can protect themselves at the very least from organophosphate accumulating in the bone tissues. Though vitamin K2 may or may not be able to protect someone from the nervous system effects of high doses of organophosphates, it can exert a protective effect, at least against chronic, low-dose exposure of organophosphates. 

 

Read more here about the dangers of bisphosphonate drugs in the treatment of osteoporosis.

Bromide and Autoimmune Diseases

While the dangers of organophosphate pesticide exposures can be mitigated at least to some extent by vitamin K2 / menaquinone-7 supplementation, the dangers of bromide-containing pesticides can be mitigated by taking iodine and iodide-containing supplements. Lugol’s iodine, which contains potassium iodide plus molecular iodine, is a supplement that is never found on grocery shelves or in pharmacies because of its ability to cure things like autoimmunity and cancer. Indeed, very high doses of potassium iodide as an expectorant can cure asthma and prevent serious COVID health problems from developing, but that’s not all. Potassium iodide again, in very high doses, also protects the body from things like radiation exposure and nuclear fallout. So it stands to reason that if the health benefits of Lugol’s iodine were common knowledge, many people would readily buy some Lugol’s iodine right off the shelves and take this nutrient substance religiously. But alas, iodine is a nutrient that’s been demonized because iodine deficiency consistently maintains healthcare industry profits at a high level. Doctors are sadly taught to believe in things like the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, for example, a sort of medical “urban legend” regarding iodine to ensure that they steer patients away from this healing nutrient that would serious damage the medical industry and reduce Big Pharma’s bloated power over the world. 

 

Bromide exposure and intoxication was once well-known as the cause of approximately 10% of all psychiatric hospital admissions. Today though, bromide is applied in big dumps from crop-spraying airplanes over fields that continue to emit toxic bromide into nearby neighborhoods affecting children (who suffer lower IQs and health problems like asthma as a result), pregnant women (who are more likely to give birth to children with serious health issues like autism), and regular adults (who are more likely to develop obesity and a wide array of health problems including autoimmune disease and cancer). But bromide exposure occurs not just through crop sprays and lawn applications of insecticides. This toxin is also found in food items like commercial bread products, in soda, on pajamas and other clothing items, in furnishings, as flame retardants in fire extinguishers, and yes, in pharmaceuticals that are, in fact, even used to treat autoimmune diseases.

 

Lugol’s iodine is a nutrient that often reverses the symptoms of autoimmune disease and it also protects the body against toxins like bromide. So this nutrient substance only produces its miraculous healing results after it is taken long enough to purge bromide from the body. This purge, known as the Bromine Detox, often involves a skin rash and a long list of symptoms that can be uncomfortable for some patients. Many patients follow a protocol that helps them avoid the uncomfortable effects of the Bromine Detox though. But after the bromine has been successfully purged from the body, people often experience a renaissance of restored health and well-being. 

 

The problem of iodine deficiency and bromide toxicity is a rut that stops many autoimmune disease patients from moving forward with healing, but there are experts like Dr. Guy Abraham and Dr. Brownstein who have worked hard to develop protocols to help patients gain traction and understand the dynamic of a nutrient deficiency that creates a particular kind of susceptibility to certain toxins. 

 

To learn more about organophosphates and bromide-containing toxins and how to overcome the negative health impact of these environmental toxins, download our book Root Cause here.

Heavy Metals and Autoimmune Disease

Heavy metals alter the way the immune system works and a number of studies have demonstrated that heavy metal toxicity can cause autoimmune disease symptoms. Heavy metals can inhibit immune cell proliferation and activation in the body. 

Lead Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

Lead is one of the heavy metals that can cause significant immune dysfunction in the human body. Indeed, the human body appears to be exquisitely sensitive to lead exposure. Lead impacts the reproductive system, the brain and nervous system, the liver, the kidneys, and the immune system to cause an array of symptoms that look identical to autoimmune disease.

 

Lead exposure is more common than a lot of people think. This heavy metal is widely deposited. 

 

Studies have shown that both animals and humans who are exposed to lead are more likely to experience a “shift” in immune system function with an increased risk in developing autoimmune disease symptoms. At the same time, those who are exposed to lead are also at an increased risk of developing cancer and severe infection. 

 

Gold Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

Gold salts that are used to treat certain autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis have been strongly correlated with causing autoimmune diseases like autoimmune thrombocytopenia, autoimmune glomerulonephritis and various other autoimmune disorders.

 

Cadmium Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

In animal models, cadmium exposure causes autoimmune disease symptoms that vary from species to species. 

 

Mercury Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

There is solid scientific evidence demonstrating that mercury induces autoimmune disease symptoms in both humans and animals. Despite this fact, the dental industry in the United States and other countries continues to install mercury dental fillings as standard treatment for cavities. Mercury exposure can occur through vaccine administration as well as through food, particularly seafoods that contain methylmercury.

 

Aluminum Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

Aluminum is a neurotoxin and exposure to aluminum has been strongly correlated with serious diseases like autism and Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum is an ingredient in most vaccines and it is also present in deodorants and antiperspirants, cosmetics, lotions and moisturizers, aluminum foil, cooking pots and utensils, soft drink cans, and antacids. So many people are exposed to a great deal of aluminum in a normal day without ever realizing that aluminum causes autoimmune disease symptoms.

 

The FDA does not require vaccines to undergo safety assessments to ensure that all ingredients are safe and non-toxic. Aluminum is an ingredient in many vaccines that causes autoimmune and inflammatory disease symptoms. In children, exposure to aluminum through vaccines is exceptionally high and their sensitivity to aluminum is higher than that of adults.

 

Vaccines and Autoimmune Diseases

Vaccination is a hot topic right now in terms of autoimmunity as they rightly should be. The COVID vaccine brought to light how any vaccine can negatively impact human health in both adults and children but prior to COVID, parents of autistic children had been noting correlations between vaccine administration and the development of severe neurological symptoms in their kids. 

 

Vaccine ingredients are often at least partially undisclosed and unknown and the topic of vaccines is often intimately related to the topic of toxins such as heavy metals. Many vaccines contain heavy metals like mercury or aluminum. Indeed, aluminum vaccine exposure and organophosphate insecticide exposure can work together to create autoimmune disease symptoms. Read more about how aluminum and organophosphates interact here.

 

It’s bizarre to write about vaccines at this point in history and try to walk the line between the political rhetoric that protects vaccines and the health facts surrounding these so-called “medicinals”. As someone who has received practically every vaccine available (except the COVID vaccine) due to my travels off the beaten path in third world countries, I can’t say that I am 100% anti-vaccine in the sense that, I believe that in some cases, vaccines may have once been a good thing. But because I now know about healing substances like Chlorine Dioxide Solution / Miracle Mineral Supplement and other over-the-counter, non-toxic medications that can cure many diseases, it has become harder and harder for me to support the administration of vaccines. I believe that some of the vaccines I’ve been given have made me very sick, in fact, rather than protecting me from illness. 

 

The COVID vaccine fiasco has definitely challenged my view of vaccines even further. I felt an instant distrust and sense of danger around this vaccine from the moment it was introduced in large part because I knew already that an easy, non-toxic cure for COVID was available, but being hidden from the public (Chlorine Dioxide Solution). But while I didn’t go and get a COVID vaccine myself, I understand why people did go and get the vaccine. And I know a number of people who have suffered severe health-related injuries due to the COVID vaccine. I believe that there are ways to treat and cure COVID vaccine injuries and to treat and cure vaccine injuries like autism as well, but these cures don’t come from conventional medicine. Conventional medicine, after all, is the creator of these woes and they profit greatly from them. Often, people who are vaccine-injured have a hard time crossing over into the anti-vaxxer stance because there’s little gray area between pro-vax and anti-vax. To be anti-vax requires that people step across a border into a whole new world that largely spurns conventional medicine (or so it seems). I can appreciate this problem and the difficulties that people face in facing this transition. The consolation prize for those who do, is the fact that there are cures available for autoimmune disease on the other side of the border. In conventional medicine, there are only “treatments” and drugs that often cause additional forms of disease.

 

Prior to COVID, vaccine injuries were much more common than most people realized and I believe that Big Pharma pushed the limits in terms of what the general public was able to ignore and deny in terms of healthcare. Nowadays, even doctors are reading books and reaching out to try to figure out why the healthcare system feels and seems so broken and non-sensical. Personally, I believe that the topic of vaccination and autoimmune disease could fill an entire book or perhaps several volumes of books, but in this discussion, I want to stick to a thought summary that encourages readers to simply consider the correlation between vaccines and autoimmune disease. But that being said, it’s important to look at the connection between autoimmunity and vaccines and acknowledge that autoimmune disease symptoms caused by the COVID vaccine or by other vaccines can be treated. Those who believe that their autoimmune disease symptoms can’t be cured are essentially feeding the Conventional Medicine Machine by giving Big Pharma exactly what it wanted from releasing the COVID vaccine and other vaccines: more profits from more disease. 

 

Can infection prevent autoimmune disease?

In addition to the topic of vaccines and autoimmune disease, it’s important to mention here that some research has shown that natural infection processes can, in some cases, inhibit the development of autoimmune disease later in life. Indeed, diseases like malaria can be used to cure other diseases in a treatment process known as Plasmodium Immunotherapy. Indeed, Plasmodium Immunotherapy has been used to cure cancer naturally which is thought-provoking in this autoimmune disease discussion because of the tight relationship between autoimmunity and cancer. The idea that a natural infection can prevent autoimmune disease from developing is yet another argument against vaccination in terms of immune system function and human health. In other words, some scientists believe that diseases that were once common during childhood actually prevented the onset of autoimmune disease symptoms later in life. 

 

Formaldehyde, Vaccines, and Autoimmunity

Formaldehyde is another substance that’s used in the development of vaccines to inactivate viruses and other pathogens and this substance is well-known for its ability to alter immune system function. We talk more in depth about formaldehyde below. 

 

Formaldehyde and Autoimmune Disease

Formaldehyde has been classified as a human carcinogen and given the connection between autoimmune disease and cancer, this is an important fact. Formaldehyde is used in manufacturing, embalming, and in healthcare. 

 

  • Furnishings
    • Manufactured wood in furnishings may contain formaldehyde that has not been properly sealed such that it is constantly gassing off.
  • Building Materials
    • Formaldehyde is found in many building materials include:
      • Plywood
      • Particle board
      • Paints
      • Varnishes
      • Resins
      • Finishes
      • Adhesives
      • Coatings
      • Plastics. 
  • Insulation
    • Foam insulation, glasswool, rockwool, and urea foam insulation all release formaldehyde.
  • Flooring Materials
    • Formaldehyde is found in many floorboard materials including bamboo.
  • Vaccines
    • Formaldehyde is used in vaccines to inactivate toxins and pathogens. 
  • Disinfectants
    • Formaldehyde can be used as a disinfectant. 
  • Some medications
    • Formadon
    • Lazerformalyde
    • Forma-Ray
    • Formalyde-10 Spray
    • Formalaz
    • Formaldehyde 10%
    • Methenamine Hippurate
  • Personal Care Products
    • Body lotion
    • Shampoo and conditioner
    • Toothpaste
    • Soap
    • Sunscreen
    • Dishwashing liquid
    • Household cleaning products
    • Laundry Detergents
    • Fabric softener
    • Perfume
  • Cosmetics
    • Formaldehyde is an unlisted ingredient in many cosmetics products.
      • Nail polish
      • Keratin hair-smoothing products
      • Lipstick
      • Eye shadow
      • Foundation makeup
    • Preservatives that release formaldehyde include the following:
      • Benzylhemiformal
      • Quaternium-15
      • 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol
      • Sodium hydroxymethylglycinate
      • 5-bromo-5-nitro-1,3-dioxane
      • Diazolidinyl urea
      • Imidazolidinyl urea
      • 1,3-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (or DMDM hydantoin)
  • Embalming
    • Formaldehyde is used in the U.S. as an embalming agent. It has been banned in the European Union due to its carcinogenic properties.
  • Flame retardants
    • Formaldehyde is found in flame retardants that are sprayed on computers, mattresses, couches, and vehicle interiors.
  • Clothing and Bed Linen
    • Formaldehyde is present in many clothing and permanent press linen products. 
    • Clothing that contains a lot of dyes or that requires constant dry-cleaning also contain higher formaldehyde residues. 
    • Formaldehyde exposure through the skin is often an undiagnosed cause of dermatitis or eczema.
  • Gas Stoves
    • Gas stoves can outgas formaldehyde.
  • Kerosene Heaters
    • Kerosene heaters can outgas formaldehyde.
  • Natural Gas Ovens or Stovetops
    • Formaldehyde can be released into the home in high quantities via a gas stove especially if it does not have a venting hood to remove fumes.
  • Chemical Fertilizers
  • Plastic Food Containers
    • Plastic soda bottles and melamine tableware all can release formaldehyde.
  • Vehicle Emissions
    • If you warm up your car in the morning and fumes from the car enter your house, you may be breathing in formaldehyde.
  • Pesticides
    • Commercial agricultural insecticides and domestic insecticides like cockroach bombs, for example, contain formaldehyde which can leave unhealthy residues in the home or in job settings.
  • Animal Foods
    • Formaldehyde is used in the manufacturing process of animal foods to prevent the growth of Salmonella.

 

Formaldehyde Exposure Immune System Effects

People who are exposed to high levels of formaldehyde experience decreased NK cells, regulatory T cells, and CD8+ effector memory T cells, demonstrating the impact that formaldehyde has on immune system function. Women are often exposed to greater quantities of formaldehyde through cosmetics, personal care products, and as a result of cooking. This substance tends to be particularly toxic in regard to thyroid gland and endocrine function in general.

 

Symptoms of Formaldehyde Sensitivity

When formaldehyde is present at 0.1 parts per million in the air, many people experience the following symptoms of exposure:

 

  • Irritated, watery, itchy, burning eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Nosebleeds
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Skin irritation

 

Chronic exposure to formaldehyde has been associated with the following symptoms:

 

  • Mucus membrane irritation
  • Asthma attacks
  • Bronchitis
  • Cellular damage
  • DNA damage
  • Autoimmune disease symptoms
  • Chronic inflammation (particularly of the respiratory system)
  • Increased risk of cancer (particularly blood and bone cancers)
  • Memory issues
  • Learning problems
  • Brain function abnormalities

 

Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Formaldehyde Exposure

Animal studies have shown that regular, chronic exposure to formaldehyde causes the thyroid gland to shrink which, in turn, causes disruptions in the production of thyroid hormones. Rats who were exposed to formaldehyde experienced T4 deficiency, decreased levels of T3, and spikes in the production of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). 

 

Other studies have shown that formaldehyde may interfere with the thyroid gland’s ability to absorb iodine. Low iodine intake (iodine deficiency) can increase a person’s susceptibility to formaldehyde exposure and sensitivity reactions so, once again, Lugol’s iodine is a vital nutrient substance that needs to be taken religiously to protect the body from formaldehyde. 

 

Autoimmune thyroid diseases like Hashimoto’s or Grave’s disease can actually be caused by a combination of iodine deficiency and formaldehyde exposure. 

 

How to Avoid Formaldehyde Exposure

The following list of ingredients are all essentially a form of formaldehyde or they release formaldehyde. As such they should be avoided:

 

  • Methylene Oxide
  • Methylene Glycol
  • Methyl Aldehyde
  • Methanal
  • Methanediol
  • Formalin
  • Formic aldehyde
  • Benzylhemiformal
  • Quaternium-15
  • 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol
  • Sodium hydroxymethylglycinate
  • 5-bromo-5-nitro-1,3-dioxane
  • Diazolidinyl urea
  • Imidazolidinyl urea
  • 1,3-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (or DMDM hydantoin)

Mold Exposure and Autoimmune Disease

The idea that autoimmune disease is impacted by environmental factors is an undeniable fact. Chemical toxins that cause autoimmune disease are not the only environmental factors that can cause symptoms though. Mold is an insidious environmental consideration for anyone with autoimmune disease symptoms. Mold that causes autoimmune disease symptoms may be found growing on walls or floors in homes or it can be found in foods like cereal grains. Anyone who is suffering from autoimmune disease symptoms needs to investigate the possibility that mold is playing a role in symptoms to rule out the possibility, particularly in individuals who seem to be unable to heal from autoimmune disease.

 

What is toxic mold?

Toxic mold is a member of the fungi kingdom and it is a part of the natural environment. Molds reproduce by releasing spores into the air that can colonize when they settle on moist surfaces in the home or in the body. 

 

Mold spores are literally ubiquitous, but they are not always harmful and in fact, many forms of mold are essential for life on earth to break down dead organic matter like fallen trees or dead leaves. That being said, not all types of mold are toxic. The molds that produce mycotoxins are the most toxic to humans so we’ll focus here on how these mycotoxin-producing molds can autoimmune disease symptoms.

 

There are several hundred known types of mycotoxins. Two of the most poisonous types of mycotoxins are aflatoxin and ochratoxin A. Aflatoxin is produced by Aspergillus and ochratoxin is produced by Penicillium. Both of these types of mold are commonly found in cereal grains, oilseeds, tree nuts, and spices. They are also found in houses that have been damaged by moisture.

 

Another dangerous mycotoxin is Stachybotrys or “black mold”. Autoimmune disease symptoms can be caused by black mold and indeed, Stachybotrys can even cause death. Black mold is often found growing in homes where there has been water damage, leaks, water condensation, or flooding. It is greenish-black in color.

 

Some people are especially sensitive to or allergic to mold spores. Mold allergy or sensitivity can cause symptoms of asthma or other respiratory problems as well as symptoms of autoimmune disease.

 

Symptoms of Mold Toxicity

Mycotoxins can cause a variety of symptoms that mimic autoimmune disease. These include:

 

  • Chronic sinus infections
  • Respiratory congestion
  • Wheezing
  • Chronic headaches
  • Leaky gut
  • Gut dysbiosis
  • Neurological symptoms
  • Brain fog
  • Memory loss
  • Insomnia
  • Vision impairment
  • Mood disorder

 

Mold as an Endocrine Disruptor

In both men and women, mold exposure can cause hormone imbalance, thyroid dysfunction, menstrual problems like breakthrough bleeding, fatigue, body temperature dysregulation, mood problems, and other mental health issues. 

 

Certain mycotoxins essentially behave as endocrine disruptors in both men and women due to their tendency to cause cytokines to be released en masse which in turn, triggers the hypothalamas to become dysregulated. The hypothalamus is the part of the brain that regulates endocrine gland functioning throughout the body so if this part of the brain is dysregulated, the entire endocrine system becomes imbalanced which can lead to an array of reproductive organ problems including:

 

 

Toxic mold exposure causes general inflammation which means that it can cause symptoms of several different autoimmune diseases. Indeed, mold exposure can cause vitamin and mineral deficiencies, a topic that we’ll explore in greater depth later on.

 

Mold and Hashimoto’s Disease

Studies have shown that mycotoxins can trigger Hashimoto’s disease, an autoimmune thyroid disease. Autoimmune thyroiditis can then trigger various other illnesses and disease symptoms to complicate the issue further.

 

What drugs trigger autoimmune disease?

A number of medications have been identified as the sole cause of autoimmune disease. This is thought-provoking and deserves attention because often, drugs can cause autoimmune disease symptoms many years after the initial exposure. Scientists acknowledge that this fact presents an important problem for patients who are unable to prevent themselves from essentially being poisoned by Big Pharma and having no recourse to protect themselves or prove that a given drug caused their disease. Establishing a direct link between autoimmune disease and medications is difficult and it requires funding in order for scientists to do the necessary research and find causal connections. Often funding for research simply isn’t available because big pharmaceutical companies do not want scientists to prove that medications cause autoimmune disease.

 

Drugs are one of several toxins that cause autoimmune disease which is why we always stress that our clients need to systematically detoxify their lives and their livers as one of the most important steps toward healing. Chemicals that cause autoimmune disease aren’t always environmental and, in fact, these chemicals are often found in the very medications that doctors prescribe to treat autoimmune disease. An excellent example of this is the drug Pyridostigmine Bromide which is prescribed as a so-called treatment for myasthenia gravis. This drug actually causes the symptoms of myasthenia gravis in patients who don’t have this disease because it contains bromide. While the pyridostigmine molecule may very well inhibit symptoms of myasthenia gravis, Big Pharma chose to combine the pyridostigmine molecule with the toxic bromide molecule rather than combining pyridostigmine with another, less toxic halogen molecule like iodide because iodide would act as a cure for myasthenia gravis and conventional medicine specifically avoids all cures for disease. Cures, after all, are not as profitable as treatments that cause patients to experience lingering symptoms of disease. Read more here about bromide exposure through both drugs and insecticides and myasthenia gravis symptoms.

 

Women tend to be diagnosed with autoimmune disease much more often than men because they are prescribed toxic drugs like birth control pills and autoimmune-inducing antifungal medications to treat yeast infections. Autoimmune disease and birth control are heavily correlated because birth control pills contain synthetic, or rather, NOT NATURAL hormones. Synthetic molecules that interact with the natural human receptors in the body cause damage to the receptors because the body recognizes that they’re unnatural and foreign. Read more here about autoimmune disease and birth control pills and the dangers of synthetic hormones.

 

Medications That Cause Autoimmune Disease

Autoimmune disease is a common diagnosis perhaps because there are so many medications that cause autoimmune disorders. Indeed, a number of commonly used over-the-counter drugs like ibuprofen (which is sold under brand names like Advil, Motrin, etc.), naproxen-sodium, and diclofenac that are used to treat common problems like headaches have been associated with the development of autoimmune disease. Cough medications like dextromethorphan and other over-the-counter drugs that seem harmless contain toxins like bromide that accumulate in the body over time and that stay put to cause major health issues like autoimmune thyroiditis. Read more here about bromide and bromine salts that are found in a number of prescription and over-the-counter medications. 

 

Women tend to be disproportionately affected by drug-induced autoimmune diseases in part because of the role that synthetic hormones play in these disease processes. There’s a correlation between exposure to oral contraceptives and autoimmune disease that can explain at least to some extent, why women are more likely to be diagnosed with autoimmune disease. Many doctors are unaware of this correlation and if they become aware of it, they’re unlikely to prescribe a healing protocol for a woman suffering from autoimmunity, but rather, they’ll prescribe other, different drugs that, in turn, can cause additional symptoms of new autoimmune diseases. So patients have to inform themselves and be prepared to protect themselves and their loved ones from the harm that can happen as a result of medications that cause autoimmune disease or that can exacerbate autoimmune disease symptoms.

 

Note that in the sections that follow, we have provided a list of drugs that cause autoimmunity, but the list is not exhaustive. Indeed, new drugs are constantly being introduced that cause autoimmune disease symptoms and many drugs that cause autoimmunity have not been studied to prove that they play a role in symptoms. So, if you feel strongly that a drug that you’re taking has caused autoimmunity, it’s probable that you’re right even if the drug is not listed in this article. 

 

Can medication cause autoimmune disorder?

The correlation between autoimmune disease and medication is just as strong as the correlation between autoimmune disease and infection. This makes sense because many medications like antibiotics that cause autoimmune disease, actually encourage the colonization of pathogens in remote locations in the body. One could say that the antibiotic medication caused the autoimmune disease symptoms or one could say that colonization by pathogens caused the symptoms to develop. But medications often cause physiological vulnerabilities that leave the body susceptible to infection. And infection can then cause symptoms of autoimmune disease. Medications can also cause liver toxicity and toxic buildup in the kidneys, the thyroid gland, or in other areas of the body. Even without pathogenic colonization, toxic overload due to drug administration can be the cause of autoimmune disease symptoms.

 

Again, I want to reiterate that the lists of medications that we provide below that cause autoimmune disease are not exhaustive. Indeed, we don’t include mention of every autoimmune disease and the medications that cause each and every one because to do so would involve writing hundreds of pages of material. Medication as a trigger for autoimmune disease is a big topic that has been observed by thousands and thousands of scientists. Many autoimmune diseases that are caused by medications have not been studied in terms of the pharmacological agents that lead up to the development of symptoms. So, even if you don’t see your autoimmune disease listed specifically here, at least note the fact that there are many medications that cause many different types of autoimmune disorders. If you believe that you or a loved one developed an autoimmune disease as a result of taking a medication, you’re probably correct. A number of medication classes cause multiple types of autoimmune disease. For example, Proton Pump Inhibitors (which are used to treat heartburn and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease / GERD), lead to various autoimmune disease symptoms. This makes sense because Proton Pump Inhibitors lower the acidity of the stomach creating the perfect environment for Helicobacter pylori infection, a bacteria that can change shape inside the body and that has been implicated as a causative agent in different types of cancer as well as in common autoimmune disease manifestations like lupus.

 

Drug-Induced Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

Drug-induced lupus caused by sulfadiazine was first observed as far back as 1945. Since that time over 90 drugs have been identified from over 10 different drug classes as medications that can cause lupus-like symptoms. Some researchers speculate that about 10% of all lupus cases are actually caused by prescription or over-the-counter medications. Women are disproportionately affected by this problem.

 

After a patient is exposed to a drug that causes lupus, it can take from 30 days to 10 years to develop lupus symptoms which means that many patients never recognize the connection between their lupus symptoms and drugs that cause autoimmune disease. Doctors rarely catch this problem or recognize that their patients may be suffering from lupus due to medication exposure. 

 

This article contains more information about lupus cures.

 

What medications can cause lupus-like symptoms?

The medications that cause lupus that have been identified through scientific study are listed below. Remember though, not all of the drugs that cause lupus have been studied to determine that they can, in fact, trigger symptoms of this disease. If you suspect that a drug that you’re taking or that you’ve taken in the past might be playing a role in your disease, take action to detoxify your body, rebuild your liver health and work with this problem even if your doctor doesn’t know about or acknowledge the possibility that lupus is caused by drug exposure. 

 

Below is a list of medications that can cause lupus symptoms:

 

  • Ethosuximide 
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant
  • Zegerid
  • Oral Contraceptives
  • Synthetic Estrogens
  • High Blood Pressure Medications
    • Methyldopa / Aldomet
    • Lithium Carbonate / Lithium Chloride
    • Gold Salts
    • Lisinopril
  • Drugs for Mental Health
    • Chlorpromazine / Thorazine / Largactil
    • Bupropion
  • Quinidine
  • Procainamide
  • Hydralazine / Hydralazine Hydrochloride
  • Sulfadiazine
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Interferon Alpha
  • Interferon Beta
  • Spironolactone
  • Antithyroid Medications
  • Statins
    • Lovastatin
    • Simvastatin
    • Fluvastatin
    • Pravastatin
    • Atorvastatin
  • Anticonvulsant Medications
    • Ethosuximide / Zarontin
    • Phenytoin / Dilantin
    • Primadone / Mysoline
    • Valproate / Valproic Acid
    • Zonisamide / Zonegran
  • Antibiotic Agents
    • Ciprofloxacin
    • Tetracycline
    • Penicillin
    • Nitrofurantoin
    • Cefepime
    • Cefuroxime
    • Isoniazid / Isonicotinic acid hydrazide
    • Minocycline / Minocin
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs / NSAIDs 
    • Ibuprofen / Motrin / Advil
    • Diclofenac / Voltaren
    • Naproxen Sodium / Aleve / Naprosyn
    • Aspirin
    • Ketorolac / Toradol
    • Celecoxib / Celebrex
    • Salsalate / Amigesic
    • Etodolac / Lodine
    • Indomethacin / Indocin
    • Ketoprofen / Orudis
    • Nabumetone / Relafen
    • Oxaprozin / Daypro
    • Sulindac / Clinoril
    • Piroxicam / Feldene
    • Tolmetin / Tolectin
  • Terbinafine
  • Carbamazepine
  • Penicillamine
  • Zafirlukast / Accolate
  • Amiodarone
  • Fluorouracil agents
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Interleukin-2
  • Clobazam / Frisium / Onfi
  • Tocainide
  • Adalimumab / Humira
  • Certolizumab Pegol / Cimzia
  • Simponi / Golimumab
  • Danazol
  • Mesalazine
  • Reserpine
  • Griseofulvin
  • Gemfibrozil
  • Clonidine / Catapres
  • Hydroxyurea
  • Quinine
  • Minoxidil
  • Calcium Channel Blockers
  • Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
  • Biologicals
  • Efalizumab
  • Beta-Blockers
  • Clozapine
  • Omeprazole
  • Ticlopidine
  • Diltiazem
  • Verapamil
  • Nifedipine
  • Piroxicam
  • Thiazide Diuretics
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Acebutolol
  • Ticlopidine
  • Lansoprazole
  • Tamoxifen
  • Regorafenib
  • Leflunomide
  • Docetaxel
  • Silica 
  • Asbestos
  • Propylthiouracil
  • Antiplatelet Medications
    • Clopidogrel
    • Ticagrelor
    • Prasugrel
    • Cilostazol
    • Dipyridamole
  • Antifungal Medications
    • Ketoconazole / Nizoral
    • Itraconazole
    • Nystatin
    • Fluconazole / Diflucan
    • Vaginal Yeast Infection Medications
    • Etc.
  • Etanercept / Enbrel
    • Note that Etanercept is a drug that’s used to treat autoimmune disease, but it also causes autoimmune disease symptoms.
  • Infliximab / Remicade 
    • Note that this drug is used to treat autoimmune disease, but also causes autoimmune disease symptoms.

Drug-Induced Autoimmune Hepatitis

The wording that’s used to describe autoimmune hepatitis that’s caused by medication is “drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis”. Though technically, autoimmune hepatitis caused by drug exposure might be regarded as an “injury” or even a form of “poisoning”, Big Pharma has managed to convince people that drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis is a “disease”. Indeed, some doctors diagnose their patients with Drug-Induced Autoimmune Liver Disease (DIAILD) though, technically if a drug caused the health issue in the first place, it is not a disease, it is an injury. Patients, however, fall prey to the deceptive wording used to describe drug-induced autoimmune disease and they somehow feel responsible for the disease even though it was caused by toxic drug exposure. We discuss autoimmune hepatitis cures more in this article.

 

Medications that cause autoimmune hepatitis include the following:

 

  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs / NSAIDs 
    • Ibuprofen / Motrin / Advil
    • Diclofenac / Voltaren
    • Naproxen Sodium / Aleve / Naprosyn
    • Aspirin
    • Ketorolac / Toradol
    • Celecoxib / Celebrex
    • Salsalate / Amigesic
    • Etodolac / Lodine
    • Indomethacin / Indocin
    • Ketoprofen / Orudis
    • Nabumetone / Relafen
    • Oxaprozin / Daypro
    • Sulindac / Clinoril
    • Piroxicam / Feldene
    • Tolmetin / Tolectin
  • NSAIDs plus Antibiotics (taken at the same time)
  • Minocycline
  • Nitrofurantoin
  • Hydralazine
  • Methyldopa
  • Etanercept
  • Statins
  • Fenofibrate
  • Alpha Interferon
  • Beta Interferon
  • Infliximab
  • Azathioprine
  • Isoniazid
  • Procainamide
  • Cimetidine
  • Allopurinol
  • Lansoprazole
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Cefalexin plus Amoxicillin
  • Amoxicillin plus Metronidazole
  • Adalimumab
  • Lymecycline
  • Lymecycline plus Doxycycline

 

Drug- Induced Autoimmune Thyroiditis

A number of medications can cause autoimmune thyroiditis especially medications that contain fluoride or bromide (which may or may not be listed as ingredients). Rather, note that fluoride and bromide may be included in both prescription and over-the-counter medications under the vague term “excipients”. 

 

In the early 1900s, Lugol’s iodine was the most prescribed medicine by doctors, but after the American Medical Association (AMA) came to power, iodine was banished from the medical field and replaced with profitable drugs that could be patented. Iodine deficiency can cause a wide range of symptoms mimicking other diseases and often doctors were able to permanently cure their patients’ health problems through a simple prescription of natural Lugol’s iodine. But today, toxins like bromide and fluoride that are nearly ubiquitous in developed countries complicate iodine deficiency by compounding the deficiency with bromide or fluoride toxicity. You see, if the body becomes deficient in iodine, it becomes vulnerable to exposure and toxicity due to other halogen elements like fluorine and bromine. Most doctors today are taught in AMA medical schools that iodine is toxic.

 

Unfortunately, many patients with autoimmune thyroiditis symptoms believe that their symptoms are worsened by iodine, not realizing that the worsening of their symptoms occurs as a result of bromide and fluoride toxicity, not iodine toxicity. In the absence of iodine, bromide and fluoride can build up in the body. When iodine is then administered, bromide and fluoride are “kicked out” of the iodine receptor sites and the bromide and fluoride enter the blood supply to be excreted by the kidneys. En route, the bromide and fluoride sometimes cause symptoms of autoimmune thyroiditis which leads patients and doctors to believe that it is the iodine causing these symptoms. This confusion around iodine has caused many ill-informed scientists to believe that iodine causes autoimmune thyroiditis rather than curing it. 

 

The myth of the Wolff-Chaikoff effect that was fabricated by Big Pharma was developed to ensure that doctors would not become knowledgeable about Lugol’s iodine and how it can be used to cure autoimmune thyroiditis as well as other autoimmune diseases. Dr. Guy Abraham and Dr. Brownstein are two important experts on the use of iodine to cure disease. Readers who are interested in learning more about Lugol’s iodine as a cure for autoimmune disease should seek out material from these two doctors to better understand the truth about this vital nutrient.

 

Below are drugs that can cause autoimmune thyroiditis according to the scientific literature:

 

  • Leuprolide acetate
  • Thionamides
  • Amiodarone
  • Radioactive iodine
  • Lithium Carbonate
  • Lithium Chloride
  • Minocycline
  • Tetracycline
  • Demeclocycline
  • Doxycycline
  • Aminoglutethimide
  • Thalidomide
  • Ethionamide
  • Tuberculostatic Drugs
  • Interferon Alpha
  • Interferon Beta
  • Interleukin-2
  • Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
  • Bexarotene
  • Anti-CTLA-4

 

Drug-Induced Dermatomyositis 

Below is a list of medications that cause dermatomyositis:

 

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant
  • Statins
    • Atorvastatin
    • Fluvastatin
    • Simvastatin

 

Read more about dermatomyositis cures here.

 

Drug-Induced Behcet’s Syndrome

Below is a list of medications that can cause Behcet’s Syndrome:

 

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

 

Click here for more information about Behcet’s cures.

 

Drug-Induced Churg-Strauss Syndrome / Eosinophilic Granulomatosis Polyangiitis (EGPA)

Churg-Strauss Syndrome, also known as Eosinophilic Granulomatosis Polyangiitis is an autoimmune disorder of the blood vessels. Patients with this disease develop blood vessel inflammation that restricts blood flow to the organs and tissues causing damage. Adult-onset asthma is one of the first signs of this disease which immediately causes me to suspect bromide and fluoride exposure as a possible cause of this disease. Organophosphate exposure can also play a role in Churg-Strauss Syndrome, which lends credibility to the idea that bromide exposure plays a leading role as well. Patients with this disease can remove organophosphates and bromide from the body through supplementation with Lugol’s iodine and vitamin K2.

 

Needless to say, there’s a correlation between asthma and Churg-Strauss Syndrome and scientists have found that the link between these two diseases has to do with leukotriene synthesis inhibitor drugs. A patient with asthma who is given one of these drugs as treatment is at a higher risk of later developing Churg-Strauss Syndrome. 

 

If you are struggling with Churg-Strauss Syndrome, be sure to read more here about how to cure asthma using Lugol’s iodine, a nutrient that protects the body from bromide and fluoride exposure. Bromide detoxification symptoms are nearly identical to Churg-Strauss Syndrome. Also download our book Root Cause to learn more about organophosphate exposure, how to protect yourself from organophosphates and how organophosphates and bromide-containing insecticides can hijack the body’s immune system.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Churg-Strauss Syndrome:

 

  • Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists / Antileukotrienes / Leukotriene Synthesis Inhibitors
    • Montelukast / Singulair
    • Zyflo ZR / Zileuton
    • Accolate / Zafirlukast
  • Propylthiouracil
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced Polymyositis

Polymyositis is an autoimmune disease that involves chronic inflammation of the muscle tissues. It is related to dermatomyositis and as such, patients with this disease should also look closely at the list of medications that cause dermatomyositis. 

 

Below are medications that cause polymyositis:

 

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant
  • Statins
    • Atorvastatin
    • Fluvastatin
    • Simvastatin

Drug-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Forms of Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that involves a swelling of joint tissues. This article has a list of rheumatoid arthritis cures.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause rheumatoid arthritis:

 

  • Gold Salts
  • Penicillamine
  • Minocycline
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Anti-Tumor Necrosis Drugs
    • Humira / Amjevita / Hyrimoz / Hulio / Yusimry / Hadlima / Cyltezo / Abrilada /  Adalimumab 
    • Enbrel / Eticovo / Erelzi / Etanercept
    • Infliximab / Remicade / Inflectra / Reflexis / Avsola / Ixifi
    • Simponi / Golimumab
    • Cimzia / Certolizumab
  • Biologics
  • Fluoroquinolones
    • Ciprofloxacin
    • Levofloxacin
    • Floxin
    • Lomefloxacin
    • Enoxacin
    • Gatifloxacin
    • Moxifloxacin
    • Norfloxacin
    • Ofloxacin
    • Sparfloxacin

Drug-Induced Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junctions that cause skeletal muscle weakness that particularly affects the muscles of the eyes, face, and swallowing. Read more about cures for myasthenia gravis here.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause myasthenia gravis: 

 

  • Immune checkpoint inhibitors
  • D-Penicillamine
  • Alemtuzumab
  • Procainamide
  • Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
  • Interferon Alpha
  • Interferon Beta
  • Antiarrhythmic Drugs
    • Chloroquine
    • Hydroxychloroquine
    • Propafenone
  • Anesthesia 
  • Neuromuscular Blockers
  • Antibiotics
    • Macrolides
    • Fluoroquinolones
    • Aminoglycosides
    • Penicillins
    • Sulfa Drugs
      • Trimethoprim / Sulfamethoxazole / Bactrim
    • Cephalosporins
    • Clindamycin
  • Beta-adrenergic blockers
  • L-Type Calcium Channel Blockers
  • Antipsychotics
  • Benzafibrate
  • Statins
    • Atorvastatin
    • Fluvastatin
    • Simvastatin

Drug-Induced Autoimmune Pemphigus

Pemphigus is an autoimmune disease that involves the skin and mucous membranes. In pemphigus, patient’s experience blisters on the chest, back, and shoulders. Drugs are one of the main triggers for this disease. Thus, like autoimmune hepatitis, medication-related injuries actually cause symptoms which means that this really shouldn’t be classified as a disease at all, but rather as a drug-related injury. Vitamin B deficiency can be linked to autoimmune pemphigus.

 

Below is a list of medications that can cause Paraneoplastic Pemphigus:

 

  • Thiol Drugs
    • Penicillamine
    • Captopril
    • Tiopronine
  • Phenol Drugs
    • Aspirin
    • Heroin
    • Rifampin
    • Levodopa
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs / NSAIDs 
    • Ibuprofen / Motrin / Advil
    • Diclofenac / Voltaren
    • Naproxen Sodium / Aleve / Naprosyn
    • Aspirin
    • Ketorolac / Toradol
    • Celecoxib / Celebrex
    • Salsalate / Amigesic
    • Etodolac / Lodine
    • Indomethacin / Indocin
    • Ketoprofen / Orudis
    • Nabumetone / Relafen
    • Oxaprozin / Daypro
    • Sulindac / Clinoril
    • Piroxicam / Feldene
    • Tolmetin / Tolectin
  • Calcium Channel  Blockers
    • Amlodipine (Norvasc)
    • Isradipine
    • Diltiazem (Cardizem, Tiazac, etc.)
    • Felodipine
    • Nifedipine (Procardia)
    • Nicardipine
    • Nisoldipine (Sular)
    • Verapamil (Calan SR, Verelan)
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced POEMS Syndrome

POEMS syndrome is an autoimmune blood disorder that causes damage to the nervous system and other parts of the body including the spleen, lymph nodes, liver, endocrine glands, bones, and skin. As a blood and bone disease, POEMS Syndrome sufferers should look closely at organophosphate insecticide and bromide-containing insecticide exposures that might be causing or worsening their symptoms. Vitamin K2 deficiency and iodine deficiency could play an important role in worsening symptoms of this disease as well. Read more about cures for POEMS disease here.

 

Also note that Proton Pump Inhibitors have specifically been cited as medications that cause POEMS syndrome. These drugs make the body vulnerable to Helicobacter pylori which is a bacterial infection that is has been implicated as the cause of many different types of autoimmune disease. H. pylori infection can be cured with Chlorine Dioxide Solution

 

Below is a list of medications that cause POEMS Syndrome:

 

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

 

Drug-Induced Relapsing Polychondritis

Relapsing Polychondritis is an autoimmune disease that involves multiple systems of the body, inflammation, and the deterioration of cartilage. It is a painful disease that often leads to joint deformity and issues pertaining to breathing, heart function, and blood vessel function. 

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Relapsing Polychondritis:

 

  • Programmed Cell Death 1 Blockade Drug
    • Nivolumab
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced Sarcoidosis /Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann Disease

Sarcoidosis is a disease that involves the abnormal collection of inflammatory cells that form lumps called granulomata. Read more about cures for sarcoidosis here.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Sarcoidosis:

 

  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
    • Ipilimumab
  • Nivolumab
  • Pembrolizumab
  • Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
  • BRAF Inhibitors
  • Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Antagonist
    • Etanercept
    • Adalimumab
    • Infliximab
  • Interferons
    • Interferon Alpha
    • Interferon Beta
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that impacts the joints of the spine and especially where the spine and the pelvis join together. 

 

Several drugs like Tumor Necrosis Alpha Antagonists are regularly prescribed by doctors to treat rheumatoid arthritis as well as ankylosing spondylitis. These drugs, however, can cause lupus symptoms. Specifically, the drug Infliximab for ankylosing spondylitis can cause lupus symptoms to develop in patients. So, though infliximab and lupus symptoms are correlated, the scientific literature indicates that infliximab is not a good treatment choice for ankylosing spondylitis.

 

One thing that’s particularly interesting about how infliximab works as a drug trigger for lupus in individuals with ankylosing spondylitis, is the fact that lupus is already correlated with arthritis symptoms. So there’s a correlation between lupus and arthritis symptoms already. But then, in individuals who are suffering from arthritis of the spine / ankylosing spondylitis, infliximab triggers lupus, which demonstrates a connection between lupus and arthritis that’s worth further consideration.

 

Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitors are used to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis despite the fact that these drugs can cause autoimmune disease symptoms. The drug adalimumab, a Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor, for example, can cause the following autoimmune diseases to develop:

 

  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Vasculitis
  • Psoriasis
  • Sarcoidosis / Sarcoid-Like Granulomas

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Ankylosing Spondylitis:

 

  • Tumor Necrosis Alpha Antagonists
    • Infliximab
    • Adalimumab
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant
    • Zegerid

Drug-Induced Pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disease that affects the skin. In the scientific literature there are strong associations between the administration of gliptin drugs and bullous pemphigoid. Gliptins are often prescribed to diabetic patients who then later develop bullous pemphigoid lesions. 

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Bullous Pemphigoid:

 

  • Metronidazole
  • Captopril / Capoten
  • Amlodipine / Norvasc
  • Risperidone / Risperdal
  • Gliptins / DPP-4 Inhibitors
    • Sitagliptin / Januvia
    • Tradjenta / Linagliptin
    • Nesina / Alogliptin
    • Onglyza / Saxagliptin
    • Oseni / Alogliptin + Pioglitazone
    • Glyxambi / Empagliflozin + Linagliptin
    • Qtern / Dapagliflozin + Saxagliptin
    • Qtermet XR / Dapagliflozin + Saxagliptin + Metformin
    • Trijardy XR / Empagliflozin + Linagliptin + Metformin
    • Steglujan / Ertugliflozin + Sitagliptin
    • Kombiglyze / Saxagliptin + Metformin
    • Janumet / Sitagliptin + Metformin
    • Jentadueto / Jentadueto XR / Linagliptin + Metformin
    • Itagliptin
    • Kanzano / Alogliptin + Metformin
    • Vildagliptin
  • PD-1 / PD-L1 Inhibitors
    • Pembrolizumab / Lambrolizumab / Keytruda
    • Nivolumab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Dostarlimab
  • Loop Diuretics
    • Chlorothiazide
    • Chlorthalidone
    • Hydrochlorothiazide
    • Indapamide
    • Metolazone
    • Torsemide
    • Frusemide / Furosemide
  • Penicillins
    • Penicillamine
    • Amoxicillin / Alphamox / Amoxil / Cilamox / Ibiamox / Fisamox
    • Amoxicillin / Clavulonic Acid / Augmentin
    • Ampicillin / Agpen / Alphcyn / Ampicyn / Austrapen / Ibimicyn / Penamp
    • Benzylpenicillin / BenPen
    • Benzathine Benzylpenicillin / Bicillin-LA
    • Dicloxacillin / Dicloxsig / Distaph
    • Flucoxacillin / Flubiclox / Flucil / Flopen / Flucil / Staphylex
    • Phenoxymethylpenicillin / Penicillin V / Aspecillin / Cilicaine VK, Cilicaine V, Cilopen
    • Piperacillin / Tazopip / PiperTaz / Tazocin / Piptaz Procaine / Benzylpenicillin Cilicaine

Drug-Induced Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

Autoimmune glomerulonephritis is a disease of the kidneys. Though many doctors are taught that the cause of glomerulonephritis is unknown, drug-induced glomerulonephritis has been observed by many scientists. Many medications cause kidney damage and some may cause symptoms of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. Scientists believe that autoimmune glomerulonephritis happens when certain medications cause lesions in the kidney tissues. 

 

Below is a list of medications that cause autoimmune glomerulonephritis: 

 

  • Bisphosphonate Drugs (read more about the dangers of bisphosphonates at this link)
    • Alendronate / Fosamax / Fosamax Plus D
    • Risedronate / Actonel / Actonel with Calcium / Atelvia
    • Ibandronate / Boniva
    • Zoledronic Acid / Reclast
    • Denosumab / Prolia
    • Raloxifene / Evista
    • Bazedoxifene + Estrogen / Duavee
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs / NSAIDs 
    • Ibuprofen / Motrin / Advil
    • Diclofenac / Voltaren
    • Naproxen Sodium / Aleve / Naprosyn
    • Aspirin
    • Ketorolac / Toradol
    • Celecoxib / Celebrex
    • Salsalate / Amigesic
    • Etodolac / Lodine
    • Indomethacin / Indocin
    • Ketoprofen / Orudis
    • Nabumetone / Relafen
    • Oxaprozin / Daypro
    • Sulindac / Clinoril
    • Piroxicam / Feldene
    • Tolmetin / Tolectin
  • Puromycin
  • Cyclosporine-A
  • Penicillamine
  • Gold Salts
  • Captopril
  • Hydralazine
  • Procainamide
  • Sulfadiazine
  • Interferon Alpha
  • Interferon Beta
  • Antiplatelet Drugs
  • Anti-angiogenesis Drugs

Drug-Induced Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that involves demyelination of nervous system tissues. Because vitamin B12 deficiency can cause symptoms that are identical to MS, patients with this disease should always be given a vitamin B12 injection or vitamin B12 powder mixed with Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) that’s applied topically to the skin.

 

The following drugs listed below cause liver-induced injury and autoimmune liver disease symptoms in those with existing multiple sclerosis: 

 

  • Fampridine (can cause liver injury in MS patients)
  • Teriflunomide
  • Fingolimod
  • Alemtuzumab
  • Interferon Beta
  • Mitoxantrone
  • Dimethyl Fumarate

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Multiple Sclerosis:

 

  • Oral Contraceptives / Birth Control Pills / Synthetic Hormones
  • Etanercept / Enbrel
  • Adalimumab
  • Infliximab / Remicade
  • Amitriptyline
  • 5-Fluoouracil + Levamisole (Combination Treatment)
  • Narcotics
  • Tricyclic Antidepressants
  • Anti-anxiety medications
  • Street Drugs
    • Opioids
    • Cannabis
    • Inhalants
    • Hallucinogens
    • Stimulants

Drug-Induced Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s Syndrome is an autoimmune disease that involves dry, burning eyes and dry mouth as well as joint pain and inflammation.  Read more about Sjorgen’s syndrome cures here.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Sjogren’s Syndrome:

 

  • Hydralazine Hydrochloride
  • Anticholinergics
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced Autoimmune Vasculitis

Autoimmune vasculitis is a disease that involves inflammation of the blood vessels. But vasculitis symptoms can be caused by a number of medications. 

 

Below is a list of medications that cause autoimmune vasculitis symptoms:

 

  • Allopurinol 
  • Ethosuximide 
  • D-Penicillamine 
  • Hydralazine 
  • Levamisole 
  • Phenytoin 
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Psychoactive drugs 
    • Clozapine
    •  Thioridazine 
  • Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha agents 
    • Adalimumab 
    • Etanercept 
    • Infliximab 
  • Antithyroid drugs 
    • Benzylthiouracil 
    • Carbimazole 
    • Methimazole 
    • Prophythiouracil 
  • Antibiotics 
    • Cefotaxime 
    • Minocycline 

 

Drug-Induced Scleroderma / Systemic Sclerosis

Scleroderma or Systemic Sclerosis is a disease that involves hardening and tightening of the skin as well as issues pertaining to the blood vessels, digestion, and other internal organs. Here is more information about scleroderma cures.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Scleroderma:

 

  • Bleomycin
  • Vinyl Chloride
  • Phytonadione 
  • Gemcitabine
  • Tegafur-Uracil
  • Docetaxel
  • Trastuzumab
  • Pertuzumab
  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors
    • Omeprazole / Prilosec
    • Esomeprazole / Nexium
    • Lansoprazole / Prevacid
    • Rabeprazole / AcipHex
    • Pantoprazole / Protonix
    • Dexlansoprazole / Dexilant

Drug-Induced Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are two inflammatory bowel diseases that involve inflammation of the digestive tract. Here is more information about Crohn’s disease cures and ulcerative colitis cures.

 

Below is a list of medications that cause Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis:

 

  • Oral Contraceptives /  Birth Control Pills / Synthetic Hormones
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs / NSAIDs 
    • Ibuprofen / Motrin / Advil
    • Diclofenac / Voltaren
    • Naproxen Sodium / Aleve / Naprosyn
    • Aspirin
    • Ketorolac / Toradol
    • Celecoxib / Celebrex
    • Salsalate / Amigesic
    • Etodolac / Lodine
    • Indomethacin / Indocin
    • Ketoprofen / Orudis
    • Nabumetone / Relafen
    • Oxaprozin / Daypro
    • Sulindac / Clinoril
    • Piroxicam / Feldene
    • Tolmetin / Tolectin

Drug-Induced Hemolytic Anemia

Hemolytic anemia is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s red blood cells are broken down more quickly than normal. Drugs that have been known to cause hemolytic anemia include the following: 

 

  • Monoclonal Antibody Chemotherapy Drugs
    • Nivolumab
    • Pembrolizumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Atezolizumab
  • Beta-Lactam Antibiotics
    • Piperacillin
  • Cotrimoxazole
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Fludarabine
  • Lorazepam
  • Diclofenac
  • Cephalosporins
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Apronalide / Allylisopropylacetylurea (this drug can also cause thrombocytopenia purpura)
  • Oxaliplatin
  • Phenazopyridine

Drug-Induced Pure Red Cell Aplasia

Pure red cell aplasia is an autoimmune blood disease characterized by anemia. Patients with pure red cell aplasia are not able to produce enough red blood cells in their bone marrow. Pharmaceutical drugs that can cause pure red cell aplasia include: 

 

  • Ribavirin
  • Interferon
  • Azathioprine
  • Phenytoin
  • Isoniazid
  • Emtricitabine
  • Mycophenolate mofetil
  • Erythropoietin
  • Pembrolizumab
  • Lamivudine
  • Dapsone / Pyrimethamine (this drug has also been known to cause cholestatic jaundice)
  • Sodium valproate
  • Lenalidomide
  • Diphenylhydantoin
  • Allopurinol
  • Alemtuzumab
  • Ampicillin
  • Carbamazepine
  • Cephalothin
  • Cladribine
  • Chlorpropamide
  • Chloroquine
  • Clopidogrel
  • Estrogens
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fludarabine
  • Interferon-alpha
  • Isoniazid
  • Leuprolide
  • Linezolid
  • Micafungin
  • d-Penacillamine
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Procainamide
  • Rifampicin
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Sulindac
  • Tacrolimus
  • Trimethoprim / Sulfamethoxazole
  • Valproic Acid
  • Zidovudine

 

Related Posts:

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How to Detoxify the Body and Heal from Autoimmune Disease, Cancer, and Other Serious Diseases

Lugol’s Iodine Therapy as a Cure for Parasite Infections, Lyme Disease, and Autoimmune Disease

Pine Tree Treatments: How to Use Pine Tree Essential Oils to Cure Autoimmune Disease

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