Is there a cure for cystic fibrosis?

DISCLAIMER: Always consult a doctor before undergoing treatment of any kind. 

Cystic Fibrosis is a disease that has genetic origins according to conventional medicine. As such, cystic fibrosis is considered to be immutable and incurable according to the system of medicine that is most prevalent throughout the world. In other words, in conventional medicine there are no synthetic pharmaceuticals that have been developed by Big Pharma to cure cystic fibrosis. This isn’t surprising if you know that conventional medicine is based on capitalism and as such, there are no such things as cures when you go to a doctor’s office. Cures are bad business, after all. The goal of conventional medicine is to create repeat customers who are constantly in need of new pharmaceuticals, surgeries, and medical devices.

 

Nonetheless, there are cures for cystic fibrosis that exist outside of hospitals, clinics, and other conventional medicine environments. And these cures for cystic fibrosis do actually work though many patients who have been exposed to various pharmaceutical medications throughout their lives may require persistence and experimentation to find the right combination that works for them. The cystic fibrosis cures that we discuss here have been scientifically proven, though you will need to learn about each one so that you understand how to use the curative agent properly as you treat cystic fibrosis at home. Natural cures require an emotional commitment as part of the treatment. If you approach cures for cystic fibrosis as though they were simply medications offered for prescription by Big Pharma, you’ll likely be disappointed. Nature, including chemicals like molecular hydrogen, or hypertonic saline are safe and non-toxic, but they still require respect. These chemicals that exist in nature and that were discovered through the fact that surfers with cystic fibrosis who regularly inhale large quantities of nebulized sea air tend to have better health outcomes than cystic fibrosis patients who spend considerably less time in air filled with sea-spray are natural. But these medicines are powerful and they deserve respect even though they are natural. Learn about the nature of these medicines one-by-one and then use them and let them teach you. Nature has the ability to teach patients how to heal themselves. Always start the process slowly and with hypertonic saline, you may need to have a doctor present during the initial stages of treatment.

 

Nonetheless, if you have cystic fibrosis, you might be interested in knowing that psoriasis patients are also often healed by exposure to sea water as well as to sunlight. Indeed, there are special facilities at the Dead Sea in Jordan where psoriasis patients can go to expose themselves to sunlight and seawater, which results in total remission of psoriasis in a fair number of cases. Sunlight, is full-spectrum light that specifically has a healing impact on the liver and gallbladder. This may not seem relevant to someone with a lung disease until you read more about plastic bronchitis and the connection between the bronchial tubes and the liver via the lymphatic system. Needless to say, it isn’t surprising that cystic fibrosis patients who are exposed to sea spray and sunlight have fewer symptoms and a less severe disease progression than cystic fibrosis patients who have not been exposed to ionized sea water on a regular basis.

 

Patients with cystic fibrosis experience a buildup of mucus that thickens in the lungs, pancreas, and other organs in the body. Mucus is a detoxifying agent in the body that has the ability to trap pathogens or toxins and then remove them from the body when the mucus is properly formed. When sticky mucus cannot “flow” properly however, toxins can build up in the body. Many cystic fibrosis patients experience recurrent infections because mucus is not properly removing pathogens and toxins from the body. And sticky mucus in the airways can block respiration. Substances such as N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) help mucus “flow” while simultaneously offering a healthy dose of the powerful detoxifying agent known as glutathione to make this medicine the perfect fit for cystic fibrosis patients young and old.

 

Cystic fibrosis patients often experience recurrent sinus infections, pneumonia, or bronchitis. These diseases can be life-threatening. So finding a cure for cystic fibrosis is important. But it is also important to be able to cure lung infections without subjecting oneself (or a loved one such as a young child) to repeated treatments with antibiotics that can destroy the gut flora and lead to further infections. For this reason, we talk about Chlorine Dioxide Solution as a cure for infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Chlorine Dioxide is a super-broad spectrum medicine that is extremely non-toxic. It can be used by pregnant women, lactating women, infants, and children. Chlorine Dioxide does not kill gut flora or damage healthy human tissues which makes much less toxic and damaging than most antibiotic medications. And also, Chlorine Dioxide Solution can be used to not only prevent infection, but also to treat infections in cystic fibrosis patients the second that the patients suspects that he/she is sick. Many cystic fibrosis patients are children. The sooner you begin working with these natural cystic fibrosis treatments to cure the disease and to prevent infection, the less damage will be done to the lung tissues and digestive system.

 

Cystic fibrosis patients produce mucus that’s different from the mucus that is produced by other people. In cystic fibrosis, the mucus has an altered ion and water balance. As a result, it can be hard to cough the mucus  up out of the lungs and mucus in other areas of the body may not effectively remove pathogens or toxins either. In this document, we discus ways to clear cystic fibrosis mucus naturally and also how to cure cystic fibrosis permanently using nutritional supplements that have been scientifically shown to restore proper cell functioning that gets rids of cystic fibrosis symptoms.

 

Use the information here to find the “breadcrumb trail” of inspired scientific work and anecdotal reports that demonstrate that cystic fibrosis can be cured. Though your doctor may not have learned about nutritional supplements in his or her studies at an AMA-approved medical school, that does not mean that there aren’t scientific studies that have definitively shown that a cure exists for this disease. Doctors are educated in medical schools on the most profitable “treatments” for diseases, not the most effective treatments. Many patients don’t realize this until it’s too late. It is not your doctor’s fault that he/she does not know about cures for cystic fibrosis or other diseases. Indeed, some doctors take it upon themselves to do independent study outside of medical school to find cures for lung diseases like cystic fibrosis. Unfortunately though, many of those doctors are exiled from medicine or “burnt at the stake” for holding views that don’t mesh with Corporate Medicine and the rules of insurance companies. Nonetheless, there is a movement underway among both patients and doctors to find ways to cure disease and alleviate patient suffering. You can be among the patients who have cured cystic fibrosis with a little perseverance and faith. 

 

“The Textbook of Scientifically Proven, Holistic Cures for Chronic and Infectious Respiratory Disease” – BUY NOW!

 

Other Important Links:

Cystic Fibrosis Nutritional Supplements That Your Doctor Never Told You About

Molecular Hydrogen Treatments as a Cure for Cystic Fibrosis

Simple and Effective Natural Treatments for Pulmonary Fibrosis / Interstitial Lung Disease

N-Acetylcysteine / NAC as a Natural Cystic Fibrosis Cure

How Sea-Air and Surfing Can Improve Cystic Fibrosis Symptoms and How to Use Hypertonic Saline to Get the Same Benefits at Home

Nebulizing with Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide 3%: Effective Cure for Lung Diseases, Respiratory Infections, and More

Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy – Dr. Kelley’s Enzyme Therapy – Dr. John Beard’s Therapy for Cancer

Chlorine Dioxide Solution and Reactive Oxygen Species Medicine: Basic Overview

How to Reduce Neuroinflammation in Autism Spectrum Disorder

The Budwig Cancer Protocol – The Flax Oil and Cottage Cheese Diet

Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) Basics: What Everyone Needs to Know about This Tree-Medicine

What is Chlorine Dioxide: Bleach or Medicine?: The Chemistry of Miracle Mineral Solution

The Vitamin B17 – Laetrile – Amygdalin Cancer Cure

Iodine Therapy for Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, and Other Reproductive Organ Cancers

Lugol’s Iodine vs. Povidone Iodine for COVID: Self-Treatment That’s Scientifically Validated

Natural Cure for Asthma: Lugol’s Iodine Hormone Balancing Therapy with Molecular Hydrogen Inhalation as a Steroid Inhaler Alternative

Digestive System Cancer Cures: Real Options That Work to Cure Pancreatic Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Liver Cancer, and More…

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