DISCLAIMER: CONSULT WITH A DOCTOR BEFORE DECIDING ON A TREATMENT PLAN FOR PSORIASIS OR ANY OTHER DISEASE.

Is psoriasis caused by an infection? 

Though conventional medicine may view psoriasis as an autoimmune disease, research has demonstrated over and over again that psoriatic plaques and the arthritic symptoms that often accompany it are correlated with the presence of infectious organisms, typically before psoriasis appears on the skin. Patients who have been diagnosed as infected with certain pathogenic microorganisms have a higher risk of developing psoriasis [1]. Below are some of the infectious organisms that researchers have identified as somehow correlated with psoriasis:

  • Beta-haemolytic streptococci
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Porphyromonas gingivalis
  • Candida albicans
  • Chlamydia psittaci,
  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
  • Hepatitis C

Guttate psoriasis, which is characterized by water-droplet-shaped scaling lesions that appear on the trunk, arms, scalp, or legs. This particular type of psoriasis is typically triggered by a bacterial infection like strep throat [2]. Despite the clear association between infection and the subsequent development of guttate psoriasis, scientists do not regard psoriasis as an infection itself. 

Inverse psoriasis, which affects skin in the armpits, groin, under the breasts, and around the genitals, seems to be triggered by a fungal infection. Indeed, Candida albicans infection can mimic psoriasis. As with inverse psoriasis C. albicans tends to affect areas of the body that get warm and moist. Use of dark-field microscopy can often confirm whether the psoriatic lesions are caused by C. albicans or not. When C. albicans is the cause, the recommended treatment strategy is to keep the area dry and apply antifungal treatments regularly such as bentonite or baking soda [2][3][4].

The view that psoriasis may be caused by an infectious organism isn’t popular in conventional medicine, but the disease does behave like an infection in many respects. Most scientific research on psoriasis is carried out using light-field microscopy, but using dark-field microscopy, many scientists have discovered that diseases that once appeared to be caused by genetics or autoimmune problems are actually caused by infection. Dark-field microscopy or live blood analysis can often identify an invading pathogen when light-field microscopy fails to find an infection. 

Treating Psoriasis as an Infection

While many people are familiar with the negative connotation associated with atmospheric ozone or ozone in smog, fewer people are in-the-know about how ozone can be used to treat different diseases like psoriasis, HIV, or cancer. Ozone works to treat these diseases because it has the ability to kill infectious organisms without hurting healthy human cells.

Ozone therapy makes use of oxidation to kill pathogenic microorganisms. The oxygen that we breathe in the air is configured as pairs of oxygen atoms (O2), but ozone is a different configuration of oxygen made up of 3 oxygen atoms (O3). While the oxygen in the air we breathe is relatively stable, ozone is unstable and when it is exposed to pathogenic microorganisms, it oxidizes them (kills them with a tiny explosion) without affecting healthy cells.

O3 or ozone is made by exposing pure medical oxygen to a silent electrical discharge that causes a chemical reaction. It can then be administered in a variety of different ways. Healthy human cells thrive in a high-oxygen environment, but disease-causing pathogens are only able to thrive in low-oxygen environments. The single oxygen atom that breaks off from the O3 molecule can kill bacteria, fungi, and viruses, so it isn’t necessary to know the name of the invading pathogen. The ozone reduces pain and inflammation, it enhances blood circulation and it activates the body’s own antioxidants and free-radical scavengers. Patients who have developed psoriasis as a result of an infection can treat the infection using ozone (or MMS or DMSO) even if their doctor says the disease is NOT caused by an infection. It isn’t necessary to know the name of the invading pathogen to treat it using this method.

Treat Psoriasis with Ozone Therapy (Ozonotherapy)

WARNING: DO NOT USE OR TAKE ANTI-OXIDANTS SUCH AS VITAMIN C WHILE BEING TREATED WITH OZONE THERAPY. OZONE IS AN OXIDANT AND VITAMIN C IS AN ANTI-OXIDANT SO THEY WILL CANCEL EACH OTHER OUT.

It is important that you go to an expert for ozone therapy because ozone is fragile and it needs to be administered at the proper concentration. Often, ozone is administered for psoriasis as part of a treatment plan or a psoriasis protocol. There are ozone specialists in the following countries:

  • U.S. (5 states)
  • Mexico
  • Germany
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Cuba
  • Bulgaria
  • France
  • Hungary
  • Romania
  • Czech Republic
  • Russia
  • Poland
  • Japan

Ozone can be administered using an infusion bottle, as rectal ozone, intraveneously or using the ozone RHP technique. In all cases, administration is performed by a trained practitioner. Usually, ozone is administered from two times per week to two times per day and they’re given over the course of several weeks or several months.

The American Academy of Ozonotherapy provides a list of practitioners throughout the world. 

Other Important Links:

Is there a cure for psoriasis? 

Psoriasis Breathing Exercises – The Frolov Breathing Device

Alternative Cure for Psoriasis: Protocel/Entelev

References

Mayo Clinic (1998-2020). Psoriasis. Retrieved March 5, 2020 from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/psoriasis/symptoms-causes/syc-20355840

Rademaker, M., Agnew, K., Anagnostou, N. Andrews, M., Armour, K., Baker, C., Foley, P., Gebauer, K., Gupta, M., Marshman, G., Rubel, D., Sullivan, J., Wong, L.C. (2018). Psoriasis and infection. A clinical practice narrative. Retrieved March 5, 2020 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30079566

Menter, A., Stoff, B. (2010). Psoriasis. Retrieved March 5, 2020 from https://books.google.com.mx/books?id=9-RaZdi8H7cC&pg=PA68&lpg=PA68&dq=psoriasis+dark+field+microscopy&source=bl&ots=BICUa-SBdc&sig=ACfU3U34IfFzT5Zlwjn0VhKvZQfHnH8TpQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi3_dWrpIToAhUIC6wKHcWLBYIQ6AEwGHoECAsQAQ#v=onepage&q=psoriasis%20dark%20field%20microscopy&f=false

Harvard Health Publishing (2010). Psoriasis: More Than Skin Deep. Retrieved March 5, 2020 from https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/psoriasis-more-than-skin-deep