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Quick Summary

Scabies, is a problem that afflicts about 300 million people worldwide of all age groups and all social classes. Scabies isn’t as much a disease as it is an “infestation” and while it may seem like the kind of problem that mostly exists in undeveloped parts of the world, it’s actually relatively common in institutional settings in places like the U.S. and Europe. For example, outbreaks of scabies can occur in daycare settings and long-term care facilities, though anyone can get scabies. Pediatric scabies is, however, more common in tropical areas of the world. Though there are pharmaceutical treatments available to treat the disease (ivermectin or Stromectol, permethrin or Elimite, Lindane lotion, and Crotamiton or Eurax), the scabies mites may become resistant to them.

 

Thankfully, herbal treatments are much more complex than over-the-counter drugs for scabies which means its much more difficult for the mites called Sarcoptes scabiei to become resistant to their effects. Herbal treatments may work more slowly and in a different way than pharmaceuticals that take aim at scabies so be realistic with your expectations if you’re switching from pharmaceuticals like ivermectin or permethrin to Artemisia annua (wormwood) or bitter melon.

 

The Sarcoptes scabiei take up residence in the outer layer of the skin. They burrow in and lay eggs which leads to chronic itching and an unforgettable rash.The pimples itch mainly at night and due to constant itching, they may break open and bleed. Some people might mistake scabies for acne or mosquito bites at first, but hat sets scabies apart from acne and mosquito bites are the lines or tunnels that are made under the skin where female Sarcoptes scabiei burrow in to lay eggs.[1][2][7]

 

Prescription medications may work initially but then the mite may become resistant to them. Topical treatments include: sulfur, allethrin, thiabendazole, benzyl benzoate, crotamiton, malathion, permethrin, lindane, and monosulfiram. These treatments can cause moderate to severe side effects such as post-scabies eczema (eczematous dermatitis) that persists over time. If this happens to you, don’t lose hope. Herbal remedies work more slowly, but mites are less likely to become resistant to them. Below are some of the most important herbal remedies for scabies that are used throughout the world. [7]

 

Scabies Basics

The scabies mite lives and lays eggs in the outermost layer of the skin (the epidermis) and it releases antigens into the skin that cause inflammation, redness, and the characteristic scabies rash. Once this outer skin layer is broken by the rash, infective bacteria (e.g. streptococci or staphylococci) move in to further inhibit the host’s immune system. [7]

 

Once the host’s immune system is compromised, it becomes more difficult to overcome the infestation. It’s common for the host to have both scabies and a bacterial infection at the same time (the scabies and the bacteria complement each other–according to Isaac Goiz’s theories of biomagnetism, pathogenic microorganisms often infect their host in pairs with one microorganism creating a favorable environment for the other and vice versa). Bacterial infections, in turn, can lead to cellulitis, abscesses, or impetigo. Crusted scabies, a more severe version of the disease is associated with immune system disorders. [7]

 

Boosting the Immune System and Herbal Treatments for Scabies

 

Obviously, boosting the immune system is an important part of treating scabies successfully. Some people recover from a scabies infection without treatment, after all. If you’ve been struggling to overcome a scabies infection, you might wonder how that’s possible? It has to do with immune health and promoting your body’s immunity so that your body can fight off the infection naturally.

 

The scabies mite secretes immune-system-inhibiting substances because the host’s immune system plays an important role in overcoming this disease. But how do you go about boosting your immune system?

 

In this article, we recommend that you use several little-known immune-boosting tricks that we recommend to cancer patients to boost their immunity. These are no-nonsense, powerful immunity-boosters that will improve overall health for anyone who uses them on a regular basis:

 

  • Vitamin B17/Amygdalin/Laetrile – Vitamin B17 is found in things like grape seeds, apple seeds, and apricot kernels. The best way to get vitamin B17 is by eating 4-5 organic, raw, bitter apricot kernels up to 5 times per day.  Eat the kernels on an empty stomach between meals. Vitamin C found in other foods and supplements can “burn up” the vitamin B17, which is something you want to avoid.

 

  • Iodine Supplementation – Use Lugol’s iodine or Iodoral to feed your thyroid gland and reproductive organs. Iodine will do wonders toward balancing your hormones, which in turn, can help your body’s immune system function properly. Be sure to read about iodine here, to fully understand what to expect in terms of the bromine detoxification process.

Buy Lugol’s Iodine here. 

 

  • Pancreatic Enzymes – Pancreatic enzymes pertain to more than just digestion. When you have enough leftover pancreatic enzymes after eating a meal, whatever is left is absorbed through the intestinal walls into the bloodstream to be recycled. These enzymes travel throughout the body back to the pancreas, but on their way, they dissolve the outer cell membranes of invading pathogens as well as the fibrin sheath that forms around tumors.

Buy pancreatic enzymes here. 

  • Aloe Arborescens – Aloe arborescens is used as a powerful no-chemo, no-radiation cancer treatment. It works on many levels to restore a patient’s immune system and overall health.

 

Buy Aloe arborescens here. 

  • Biomagnetism, Magnet Therapy, or Bob Beck’s Electromagnetic Therapy – Our bodies are electrical. Science has already proven this and it makes sense, right? But conventional medicine denies the importance of electricity in the body. Biomagnetism is a medical model that’s famous in Mexico but nearly unknown in the U.S. And Bob Beck’s electromagnetic therapies are in use in conventional medicine, but they’re nearly inaccessible to the general public through doctors. Luckily, there are several vendors that offer Bob Beck’s technologies quietly for at-home use. And Magnet Therapy is also available through a company that produces the MiraMate.

 

 

Bitter Melon – Momordica charantia

 

Ayurvedic medicine practitioners use Bitter Melon Leaf extract topically on the skin to treat scabies. And you can too. Use a 4:1 tincture up to 2 times per day. Remember, this herb can cause blood sugar levels to drop so don’t overdo it. It’s absorbed through the skin so when you apply it topically, use only 1 to 3 mL at a time. 

 

Another option is to make decoction of bitter melon leaves by boiling 1/2 -1 cup of the whole herb one to two times per day. You can drink this decoction or apply it to the skin after it cools. 

 

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is famous as Plant Insulin that can be used in place of insulin to treat diabetes, but fewer people are aware of its ability to treat scabies.

 

Bitter melon leaf extract needs to be taken seriously. Do not ingest or use bitter melon topically during pregnancy or while breast feeding and exercise extreme caution when using it on children (it can cause blood sugar levels to drop).

 Buy bitter melon extract here. 

Sweet Wormwood – Artemisia annua

 

You can take sweet wormwood as a tea and also apply it to the skin as an infusion to treat scabies. An infusion of Sweet Wormwood is an extract prepared by soaking the leaves in water or milk in order to pull active ingredients out of the plant so that they become bioactive in the body [3]

 

To prepare A. annua as a tea, do not boil the water, but rather, get it to a temperature between 85 and 90 degrees Celsius and steep the tea leaves for 15 -20 minutes before drinking. Or use milk to extract the artemisinin from the leaves (the fat content helps extract the artemisinin). [4]

 

If you have access to fresh A. annua you can also macerate the leaves and then put them in cheese cloth to squeeze the fresh juices out of the plant. This yields a higher concentration of artemisinin. [4]

 

Dry A. annua leaves can be stored in a cool, dry place for up to a year and they’ll retain the full content of artemisinin intact under these conditions. The artemisinin in the Artemisia annua plant is stored in the glandular trichomes of the dried leaves and flowers along with essential oils. These essential oils naturally prevent fungi from growing there which allows the artemisinin to remain intact for long periods of time. [4]

 

Aloe

In one small study in Nigeria, crude aloe vera gel was used to treat scabies lesions. In this study, 30 patients were treated. Sixteen of the 30 scabies patients were treated with crude aloe vera gel while 14 were treated with benzyl benzoate. Of the patients treated with aloe, only 2 still had itching after 2 courses of treatment. In the benzyl benzoate group, 3 patients still had itching after 2 courses of treatment. So aloe was more effective at treating scabies than the benzyl benzoate. [8]

You can buy aloe vera plants at a local nursery and use the gel inside the plant leaves to treat yourself for scabies. Spread the gel inside the leaves on your skin on the affected areas and let it dry.

Pau d’Arco

Pau d’Arco (Tabebuia impetiginosa), also known as Lapacho, can significantly improve your overall health. It’s used to treat a variety of different diseases from cancer to diabetes, but you can use it to boost your immune system by drinking it as a tea. Don’t underestimate the power of Pau d’Arco. This is a plant that has a lot of power, but make sure you get Tabebuia impetiginosa, the tree with the purple flowers. Other species of Pau d’Arco are widely sold in health food stores, but their power to heal isn’t worth writing about. Seek out the Tabebuia impetiginosa plant and make sure you find a formulation that contains only the inner bark of the tree.

Buy Pau d’Arco (Tabebuia impetiginosa) extract here. 

 

Essential Oils

 

One study assessed the effectiveness of nine essential oils. When these oils were applied directly to the scabies mite, the order of effectiveness at killing the mites within 20 to 50 minutes was:

 

  1. Clove
  2. Palmarosa
  3. Geranium
  4. Tea Tree
  5. Lavender
  6. Manuka
  7. Bitter Orange
  8. Eucalyptus
  9. Japanese cedar [7][9]

 

The same study assessed the effectiveness of these oils when they were used to fumigate the scabies mite. The order of effectiveness when the essential oils were used as fumigation agents was as follows:

 

  1. Tea tree
  2. Clove
  3. Eucalyptus
  4. Lavender
  5. Palmarosa
  6. Geranium
  7. Japanese cedar
  8. Bitter orange
  9. Manuka [7][9]

 

These essential oils can be used topically to kill mites on the skin and they can also be used to control mites in the environment. In Australia, benzyl benzoate is combined with 5% tea tree oil to treat scabies topically. [9]

 

Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS)

 

MMS is a vitally important substance that this author has used to cure everything from drug resistant eye infections to cancer. Initially, it became famous as a cure for malaria, but it can also be used to cure scabies. MMS is nothing but a water treatment formula that’s taken in a higher dose than what’s used for simple water treatment. In various places online, MMS is scandalized and information about MMS has been covered up in order to protect the pharmaceutical industry.

 

MMS is a treatment modality that requires a small amount of learning. We recommend downloading Jim Humble’s books to learn about the MMS protocol for scabies.

 

A mixture of MMS and DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) may be even more effective at treating scabies than using MMS alone.

 

Here is a link to testimonials of people who have cured scabies using MMS.

Buy DMSO here.

 

Related Posts:

 

Bitter Melon Extract – Mormordica charantia For Cancer

References:

 

[1] Jaliman, D. (2018). What is scabies? Retrieved June 15, 2019 from https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/ss/slideshow-scabies-overview

 

[2] Murray, M. T. & Pizzomo, J. (2005). The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods.

 

[3] Hesman Saey, T., Sanders, L. (2015). Nobel goes for developing drugs from nature. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/nobel-goes-developing-drugs-nature

 

[4] Falquet, J., Ferreira, J. F. S., Gilbert, B., Hsu, E., Magalhaes, P. M., Plaizier-Vercammen, J., Sharma, V. P., Wright, C. W., Yaode, W.  (2008). Artemisia Annua as an Herbal Tea for Malaria. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2816434/

 

[5] [1] Dorsey, M. W. (2018). Tea infusions of wormwood plant cured schistosomiasis faster than commonly used drug in clinical trial. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-12-tea-infusions-wormwood-schistosomiasis-faster.html

 

[6] Cross, K. (2018). What is the best way to treat scabies at home? Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321335.php

 

[7] Thomas, J., Carson, C. F., Peterson, G. M., Walton, S. F., Hammer, K. A., Naunton, M., et al. (2016). Therapeutic Potential of Tea Tree Oil for Scabies. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4751955/

 

[8] Oyelami, O.A., Onayemi, A., Oyedeji, O.A., Adeyemi, L.A. (2009). Preliminary study of effectiveness of aloe vera in scabies treatment. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19274696

 

[9] Fang, F., Candy, K., Melloul, E., Bernigaud, C., Chai, L, Darmon, Celine, et al.  (2016). In vitro activity of ten essential oils against Sarcoptes scabiei. Retrieved June 16, 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5120413/

 

[10] Taylor, L. (2002). Technical Data Report for Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia). Retrieved http://www.rain-tree.com/bittermelon-tech.pdf