Disclaimer: Consult with a doctor before deciding on a treatment plan for cancer.
Quick Summary

Most Americans believe that if they’re eating iodized salt, their iodine needs are being met. But salt is a poor carrier for iodine. As soon as the box of salt is opened, the iodine begins to vaporize. Within days, less than 20% of the iodine remains. And to add to the lack of iodine in people’s diets, bromine, fluorine, and chlorine can all compete with iodine (with bromine being the most likely to bump iodine out of its rightful place in the body). Most Americans are exposed to far more bromine than they are to iodine which causes a build-up of bromine in the body. Bromine sedates people and it causes weight gain. Women’s iodine needs are much higher than men’s so the iodine deficiency epidemic in the U.S. is particularly concerning for females. A lack of iodine can lead to breast cancer and cancers of the reproductive organs in both men and women. By supplementing with iodine topically and by mouth, many people can enhance their overall health and vitality as well as recover from or prevent cancer.

 

Detailed Introduction

In order to really understand iodine therapy for cancer, it’s helpful to take a look at the periodic table of the elements. Iodine is the 53rd element. It’s one of the halogens along with fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and astatine. The halogen elements are extremely reactive, so reactive in fact, that they always pair up with something in nature, even if that means pairing up with themselves. Two fluorine atoms paired up make a “fluoride”, two chlorines make a chloride, and so on and so forth [1].

 

We all know that iodine is essential for thyroid health, but iodine is essential for other aspects of well-being as well [1].

 

Bromine, the element that sits just above iodine on the periodic table competes with iodine for receptor sites in the body. What this means is that if a person consumes a low amount of iodine but is exposed to bromine, the bromine can move into the body and mimic iodine by occupying iodine’s receptors. Bromine isn’t iodine and high levels of bromine can cause a variety of physiological problems in the body [1].

 

High levels of bromine can, for example, cause damage to neuron membranes which can progressively impair neuron transmission, leading to a disease called “Bromism”. The following are symptoms of Bromism:

 

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Visual hallucinations
  • Brain Fog
  • Loss of control of body movements
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Drooping eyelids (ptosis)
  • Neurological impairment
  • Psychosis
  • Seizures
  • Gastrointestinal impairment
  • Somnolence
  • Delirium [1][5][6][7]

 

There have been reported cases of bromism developing as a result of high consumption of colas that contain brominated vegetable oils. Patients may experience only one or all the symptoms listed above. Once exposed to bromine, it can take 9 to 12 days for it to be eliminated from the body which means that it can accumulate over time. Doses of 0.5 to 1 gram per day can lead to bromism [5][6].

 

Methyl bromide is toxic to human cells. Its toxicity can be mitigated by glutathione (an antioxidant that’s essential for a healthy immune system), however. The bromine ions can displace both iodine and chlorine ions in the body. Chlorine ions are essential for nerve transmission. Bromine can temporarily displace chlorine ions which can therefore lead to impaired nerve transmission [8][9][10].  

Politics

The historic movements that have led to the iodine deficiency epidemic in the United States can be easily traced to broad-sweeping decisions made by food industry leaders in the 1970’s. At this time, products like bread and flour were no longer fortified with iodine. And when iodine was removed, bromine (which competes with iodine for receptor sites) was added to these food products. Brominated vegetable oils (used to emulsify citrus soft drinks)  became common at this time [1].

 

In addition to changes in the food industry, bromine chemicals began to be used as flame retardants on mattresses, furnishings, and in other consumer products during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Bromine replaced chlorine in pools. Ethylene bromide was added to gasoline in the 1960’s. Poisonous bromomethane and ethylene bromide has been used as an agricultural pesticide as well as to fumigate homes by the tenting method [1][3][4].

 

Bromine is an effective and common pesticide used in fruit growing as well as to prevent insects and pests from attacking stored grain and other types of produce. Methyl bromide is the most common bromine-based pesticide currently in use throughout the world, but it’s use is in a decline due to the 1987 Montreal Protocol which classified it as an ozone-depleter and called for the bromine-pesticide use to stop. The United States, however, has received annual exemptions to go ahead and keep using it as a broad-spectrum pesticide on crops such as: peppers, strawberries, and tomatoes [4].

 

About 50% of bromine is used in brominated flame retardants. Brominated flame retardants are used in a wide variety of domestic and industrial appliances such as computers, insulation boards, furniture, mattresses, mobile phones, televisions, textiles, children’s pajamas, and more. It is estimated that 90% of all electrical components contain brominated flame retardants [4].

 

The United States is the world’s leading market for bromine. Israel is a major supplier of bromine [4].

 

At the time of this writing, it is difficult to find information about molecular iodine in the treatment of cancer. Google searches reveal only search results about radioactive iodine. By promoting research on radioactive iodine online, The Cancer Industry is able to cover up information about non-radioactive iodine for cancer treatment. A discussion of Google ranking and SEO strategies to cover-up information is beyond the scope of this book, but suffice it to say, iodine’s role in preventing and curing cancer has been usurped online by articles and information about “radioactive iodine”.

 

Dr. Guy Abraham, an iodine expert, provides a wry comment on the modern doctor’s fears of prescribing molecular iodine to patients while radioactive iodine is heavily promoted and pushed on patients:

 

“[Doctors] suffer from: A) a split personality which results in iodophobia within the orthoiododsupplementation range previously used safely and successfully in medical practice and iodophylia for megadoses of iodide (up to 12 grams per day); B) double standards which render those physicians intolerant to the minor side effects of the inorganic forms; C) amnesia pertaining to the inorganic, non-radioactive forms when making therapeutic decisions; D) confusion, attributing the severe side effects of organic iodine-containing drugs to inorganic iodine/iodide; and E) an altered state of consciousness, allowing doublethink, doublespeak, and contradictory logic to become acceptable. Although factors involved in medical iodophobia are still unknown, decreased cognition seems involved. Since low iodine intake is associated with intellectual impairment, deficiency of this essential element cannot be ruled out, and if present, would create a self-perpetuating phenomenon. Needless to say, medical iodophobia is contagious and can be transmitted to patients and other physicians (iatrogenic iodophobia). Medical iodophobia will remain a syndrome until the causes are discovered and effective therapy implemented. It is very likely however, that medical iodophobia will eventually be classified as an iodine-deficiency disease.”

 

In 1948, just after World War II, Wolff and Chaikoff at UC-Berkley published a study that scared doctors and the public into believing that iodine was a dangerous and toxic substance that could cause hypothyroidism in high doses. Iodine had been in wide use in the medical profession for generations, but the Wolff-Chaikoff study resulted in the removal of iodine from the American food supply as well as from medical practice [16]. Many doctors today still believe that iodine is toxic and a very dangerous substance [1].

 

During this time, while doctors were readily accepting and promoting the idea that molecular iodine is toxic and dangerous to human health (despite the fact that it had been used for generations and people buy iodized salt knowing that iodine is a necessary mineral for health), they were also readily accepting the use of radioactive iodine for the treatment of cancer and other diseases [16].

 

On top of that, Symbollon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has developed a molecular iodine product called IoGen™ to treat breast cancer. The product is being marketed as an “adjuvant” to be used in conjunction with conventional medical treatments. Often, the pharmaceutical companies will try to patent well-known natural cures and absorb them into conventional treatments by creating synthetic analogs that are just slightly different on a molecular level in order to “shelve” them or to create expensive, potentially profitable products that lure patients away from affordable, natural treatments. For example, though vitamin A is readily available in carrots and/or supplement form, pharmaceutical companies have developed a synthetic form of the vitamin that causes “side effects” that are essentially the same as vitamin A deficiency. Similarly, a synthetic version of iodine will likely cause iodine deficiency symptoms (which can be treated with other synthetic drugs, such that Big Pharma profits doubly from the patient’s iodine deficiency). Further, by pairing a very effective and affordable natural cure like iodine with conventional treatments like chemo and radiation, patients only experience the effects of natural iodine and in the context of the toxicity of conventional cancer treatments. This strategy is used by Big Pharma to make a natural substance like iodine seem less effective than it is (because it has been paired up with toxic, ineffective cancer treatments), while also encouraging  people to pair the idea of iodine with the idea of toxicity and danger (because in conventional medicine the iodine is “radioactive). Big Pharma uses basic Pavlovian psychology to reduce importance , heighten fear, and generally confuse the public in regard to naturally occurring readily available substances like iodine, vitamin B17, or vitamin A [12][13].

 

Safety and Effectiveness

Iodine is an essential nutrient in the human diet. Studies have demonstrated that areas of the world where iodine deficiency is common have a higher rate of goiter and breast cancer. Japan has the highest dietary intake of iodine at 13 mg per day. And Japan also has the lowest rates of goiter and breast cancer in the world. However, if a Japanese woman immigrates to the United States, and she follows a U.S. diet, consuming 150 mcg/day (the recommended daily allowance in the U.S.), her risk of breast cancer increases substantially. Iceland also has high iodine intake and low goiter and breast cancer rates [1][16].

 

Iodine supplementation is essential for all Americans because bromine is ubiquitous in the United States, but for patients who live in the “Goiter Belt” in the United States, iodine is even more important. Patients can do an “Iodine Loading Test” to determine the extent of their iodine deficiency (see below for information on where to purchase the Iodine Loading Test). The Iodine Loading Test can also help patients determine if they have problems absorbing iodine. Iodine absorption issues can lead to more pronounced deficiency issues [14][17].

 

Americans currently consume only 3% of the iodine that mainland Japanese residents consume each day. And the Japanese have a very low rate of cancer, particularly of the female reproductive organs. [16][17].

How Iodine Therapy Is Administered

How iodine therapy is administered depends on the product that is being used for administration. The body needs both elemental iodine as well as iodide. The breast tissue needs iodine while the thyroid is only able to make use of iodide. Lugol’s iodine (which is sold at both a 2% and 5% concentration) contains both elemental iodine and potassium iodide. Iodoral is an iodine-product in pill form that also contains both iodine and iodine. Most experts recommend beginning iodine therapy by taking 12.5 mg of Lugol’s or Iodoral per day [18][17].

 

Iodine therapy can be administered at home topically or orally. It is best to take iodine supplements early in the day, before 2:00 PM to avoid evening wakefulness. Lugol’s solution and other iodine preparations can be applied to the skin. The iodine is absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream. Or patients can take Iodoral in pill-form. When taking iodine orally, it should be taken with food [18].

 

Patients who have hypothyroidism are advised to take selenium supplements for 2 weeks before using iodine. Patients with Hashimoto’s are advised to take selenium supplements for 2 months before using iodine [17].

 

There are several supporting nutrients that are recommended below:

 

  1. Vitamin C – 2000 to 5000 mgs/day – take this supplement 4 to 6 hours AFTER iodine
  2. Selenium – 200 to 400 mcg/day – (assists with detoxification and thyroid secretion)
  3. Unrefined salt  – (Celtic or Himalayan sea salt) – ½ tsp/day in ½ c. water followed by 12 oz. of water – the salt binds to bromine and assists in detoxification
  4. Magnesium – 400 mgs/day
  5. Optional – ATP Cofactors – 1 tablet 2 times per day [17]
Possible Negative Effects

At the beginning of the iodine protocol, when iodine is taken in high doses, a number of negative effects can be observed as bromine leaves the body. These effects include:

 

  • Eyelid twitching
  • Disturbance of color perception
  • Foot twitching
  • Tingling in the extremities
  • Dark thoughts (e.g. “there is no reason to live”)
  • Depression (e.g. “there is no reason to get out of bed”)
  • Mood issues such as anxiety or mood swings
  • Mouth and tongue sores and cuts, a sore mouth
  • Dry mouth
  • Metallic taste in the mouth
  • Odd swallowing sensation (also known as “swollen glottis” in the old medical literature)
  • Body odor
  • Bromide acne which is coniform (the use of zinc can help counteract bromide acne)
  • Skin “cuts”
  • Hair loss
  • Brain fog
  • Leg and hip ache that resembles arthritis
  • Rash (bromaderma)
  • Sinus pain
  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Cherry angiomas
  • Sedation/lethargy
  • Unusual urine odor or color
  • Urethral spasm and frequent urination (may be mistaken for a urinary tract infection)
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Vision changes
  • Irritability
  • Increased salivation
  • Dream changes
  • Impaired memory/concentration
  • Tremor
  • Hormone changes
  • Kidney pain
  • Breast tenderness (this transient symptom typically resolves quickly) [1][17]
Other Important Information

Calcium supplementation can interfere with the iodine protocol [17].

 

The Iodine Loading Test can be purchased at the web site below:

https://healingsolutionshealth.com/collections/thyroid-and-adrenals/products/24-hour-iodine-loading-test-with-bromide-only  

 

Resources

 

[1] Farrow, L. & Brownstein, D. (2013). The Iodine Crisis: What You Don’t Know About Iodine Can Wreck Your Life. Devon Press.

 

[2] Kaczor, T. (2014).  Iodine and Cancer: A summry of the evidence to date. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2014-06/iodine-and-cancer

 

[3] Alaeea, M., Arisb, P., Sjodinc, A., Bergman, A. (2003). An overview of commercially used brominated flame retardants, their applications, their use patterns in different countries/regions and possible modes of release. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12850087

 

[4] Lyday, P. A. (2006). 2006 Minerals Yearbook: Bromine. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/bromine/myb1-2006-bromi.pdf

 

[5] Galanter, M., Kleber, H. D. (2008). The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment, 4th Ed.: American Psychiatric Publishing Inc.: United States.

 

[6] Horowitz, B. Z. (1997). Bromism from excessive cola consumption. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9140329

 

[7] Frances, C., Hoizey, G., Lamiable, D., Millart, H., Trenque, T. (2003). Bromism from daily over intake of bromide salt. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12733857

 

[8] Nishimura, M., Umeda, M., Ishizu, S., Sato, M. (1980). Cytotoxicity of methyl bromide: effect of methyl bromide on cultured mammalian cells. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jts1976/5/4/5_4_321/_article/-char/ja/

 

[9] Armstrong, D. & Schep, L. (2009). Comparing bromism with methyl bromide toxicity. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://doi.org/10.1080/15563650902802544

 

[10] Dr. Axe (n.d.). 9 Ways to Boost Glutathione. Retrieved May 25, 2018 from https://draxe.com/glutathione/

 

[11] Dach, J. (2018). Iodine Treats Breast Cancer, Overwhelming Evidence. Retrieved May 28, 2018 from https://jeffreydachmd.com/iodine-treats-breast-cancer/

 

[12] Desjourdy, P. C. (2006). Research Calls for Use of Molecular Iodine to Treat Breast Cancer. Retrieved May 28, 2018 from http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/research-calls-for-use-of-molecular-iodine-to-treat-breast-cancer-703118.htm

 

[13] Griffin, G. E. (1974). World Without Cancer: The Story of Vitamin B17, 3rd Ed. American Media.

 

[14] Farrow, L. (2007-2018). Iodine and the Breast. Retrieved May 28, 2018 from http://www.breastcancerchoices.org/iodine.html

 

[15] Abraham, G. E. (2018). The Safe and Effective Implementation of Orthoiodosupplementation In Medical Practice. Retrieved May 28, 2018 from http://www.optimox.com/iodine-study-5

 

[16] Abraham, G. E. (2018). The Wolff-Chaikoff Effect: Crying Wolf?  May 28, 2018 from http://www.optimox.com/iodine-study-4

 

[17] HealingSolutionsHealth (2018). The Iodine Protocol. Retrieved May 28, 2018 from https://healingsolutionshealth.myshopify.com/collections/the-iodine-protocol

 

[18] Lugol’s Iodine (2018). Iodine Supplementation Guide. Email communication.